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Examples

In addition to this collection there is a large collection of ConcepTest Examples.

Specialized sub-collections of longer activities , questions of the day and think-pair-share examples are also available.


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Results 21 - 30 of 72 matches

Learning to Think about Gravity II: Aristotle to Einstein part of Examples
The purpose of this exercise is to learn how to think about gravity, learn about scientific methodology, and transition from the Aristotelian to Newtonian to Einsteinian understanding of gravity.

Science on a Skateboard - Applications of Newton's Third Law part of Examples
A think, pair, share activity with Socratic questioning to help students begin to understand rocket propulsion.

Concept Questions for the Photoelectric Effect with Interactive Simulation part of Examples
These are interactive lecture-demonstration questions probe student understanding of fundamental concepts in the photoelectric effect.

Projectile and Satellite Orbits part of Examples
Gravitation introductory activity with interesting animation. The activity allows the student to revile the connection between the initial speed and the shape of satellite orbit.

Work: pre, during and post class questions part of Examples
This series of questions before instruction, in-class peer instruction, and post-instruction allow students to iterate and improve their understanding of work incrementally.

The Transformer: Simulation Lecture Demo part of Examples
The activity presents an interactive lecture demonstration of the operation of a transformer using a simulation.

Think-Pair-Share Analysis of the Operation of a Metal Detector part of Examples
The activity presents a Think-Pair-Share analysis of a metal detector including a simulation.

Motion Concepts: Displacement, velocity, & acceleration graphs part of Examples
Students often struggle with motion concepts. These activities focus on the graphical representations of displacement, velocity, and acceleration given a number of situations of an object moving along the x-axis. ...

Count the Fs: Why a Sample instead of a Census? part of Examples
This interactive lecture activity motivates the need for sampling. "Why sample, why not just take a census?" Under time pressure, students count the number of times the letter F appears in a paragraph. The activity demonstrates that a census, even when it is easy to take, may not give accurate information. Under the time pressure measurement errors are more frequently made in the census rather than in a small sample.

Helping Students Discover Total Internal Reflection part of Examples
Students learn the basic relationship of Snell's Law, practice applying it to a situation, then are given another situation where it "doesn't work."??? This situation turns out to be one in which total internal reflection occurs. Students are then shown what happens with classroom apparatus.