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Investigating the Modernity of the University Library part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Campus-Based Learning:Examples
Students will investigate the modernity of the university library by designing and implementing a complex survey design.

Histogram Sorting Using Cooperative Learning part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Intended as an early lesson in an introductory statistics course, this lesson uses cooperative learning methods to introduce distributions. Students develop awareness of the different versions of particular shapes (e.g., different types of skewed distributions, or different types of normal distributions), and that there is a difference between models (normal, uniform) and characteristics (skewness, symmetry, etc.).

How well can hand size predict height? part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This activity is deigned to introduce the concepts of bivariate relationships. It is one of the hands-on activities of the ‘real-time online hands-on activities’. Students collect their own data, enter and retrieve the data in real time. Data are stored in the web database and are shared on the net.

Statistics and Error Rates in Death Penalty Cases part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples

Body Measures: Exploring Distributions and Graphs Using Cooperative Learning part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This lesson is intended as an early lesson in an introductory statistics course. The lesson introduces distributions, and the idea that distributions help us understand central tendencies and variability. Cooperative learning methods, real data, and structured interaction emphasize an active approach to teaching statistical concepts and thinking.

Understanding the standard deviation: What makes it larger or smaller? part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Using cooperative learning methods, this activity helps students develop a better intuitive understanding of what is meant by variability in statistics.

An Activity to Introduce the Geoscience Perspective part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Role Playing:Examples
This role-playing exercise introduces students to geology by having them examine rocks from the perspective of a child, a sculptor, a geologist or someone from another walk of life.

Using a Groundwater Pollution Problem to Develop Professional Communication Skills part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Professional Communications Projects:Examples

Coal: China, Energy and Kyoto - I. Evaluating Coal Leases for Possible Mining part of Cutting Edge:Complex Systems:Teaching Activities
Students evaluate coal leases to determine their potential for coal mining. Each company, student group, creates subsurface geologic models for each lease. Using these models, they recommend to the company board of ...

Review exercise for introductory Environmental Science course part of Cutting Edge:Complex Systems:Teaching Activities
This activity could be used toward the end of an Introduction to Environmental Science course (or something similar) as a way to help students review for the exam, and also to make sure they are able to see the ...

Too many deer? A public hearing part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Teaching with the Case Method:Examples
Students reenact a public hearing to determine how to manage a deer herd that is overpopulated.

Recycle -- or not? A case from New York City part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Teaching with the Case Method:Examples
A case for the analysis of externalities (social costs and benefits) in the context of recycling. Drawn from a program in New York City.

Context-rich problem for cooperative group problem solving - Electric Force part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Context-Rich Problems:Examples
Context-rich problem for electrostatics in an introductory physics class. The instructional setting uses cooperative group problem solving.

National Parks Jigsaw part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Jigsaws:Examples
This jigsaw exercise has students study national parks from different perspectives. Groups can be divided up depending on the nature of the class: historian, meteorologist, geologist, and biologist.

Le Parcours de la biodiversité: A Jigsaw Activity on Biodiversity part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Jigsaws:Examples
In this jigsaw activity, students of intermediate-level French will divide into five groups to become experts on each of the five biodiversity questions featured on the Curiosphere website. They will proceed to explain their assigned aspect of the issue to a small group of students.

Exploring phyllosilicate structures with polyhedral models part of Cutting Edge:Mineralogy:Activities
In this exercise, students build polyhedral models to learn about phyllosilicate structures and how they relate to physical properties. This directed-discovery activity is a very 'hands-on' experience ...

Collaborative Research Project: Geoscience Undergraduate Curricula part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Collaborative research project in which undergraduate geoscience curricula at Research 1 institutions are compared. This project uses the methods of science to explore a topic that beginning students can understand. This project uses rubrics for self, peer, and instructor assessment.

Discovering the Principles of Relative Age Determination a Think-Pair-Share In-Class Activity part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
In this in-class activity, students are challenged to identify rock units and geologic features and determine the relative ages of these features without prior instruction in the classical methods of relative age determination.

Accuracy, Precision, and Topographic Data part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
This jigsaw style exercise challenges new geomorphology students to collect topographic data and analyze its accuracy and precision.

Evaluating the lines of evidence for plate tectonics part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
In this in-class exercise, students compare several lines of evidence that support the ideas of continental drift and plate tectonics. Before the class meeting, each student is given a preparation assignment in which he/she studies one "continental drift" and one "ocean floor data" map. In class, students divide into teams of 3, with each team member having prepared different specialties. They discuss their respective maps and look for spatial patterns among the data.