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Geology Map Observations part of NAGT:Teaching Resources:Teaching Materials Collection
Students construct the Earth's tectonic plates using geologic maps. The jigsaw method of collaborative group work is used. Skills such as careful observation, presentation, and synthesis are used to create a ...

Advanced Moon Project part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Guided Discovery Problems:Examples
The moon project is a semester-long research project about the moon; each student explores one of four assigned topics. Over 1-2 months, students make daily naked-eye observations of the moon and construct graphs ...

U.S. Population Growth: What Does the Future Hold? part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Interactive Lectures:Examples
College Algebra or Liberal Arts math students are presented with a ConcepTest, a Question of the Day and a write-pair-share activity involving U.S. population growth. The results are quite revealing and show that while students may have learned how to perform the necessary calculations, their conceptual understanding concerning exponential growth may remain faulty. Student knowledge (or lack thereof) of the size of our population and its annual growth rate may also be surprising.

Determining the Geologic History of Rocks from a Gravel Deposit part of Examples
Gravels deposited as a result of continental glaciation are used to teach introductory-level earth-science students the application of the scientific method in a cooperative learning mode which utilizes hands-on, minds-on analyses. Processes that involve erosion, transportation, and deposition of pebble- and cobble-sized clasts are considered by students in formulating and testing hypotheses.

A Send-a-Problem Exercise for Applying Labor Force Participation Models to Popular Press Articles part of Examples
Send-a-problem exercise used to link economic theory covered in a labor economics course with related trends exemplified in a popular press article.

Using Cooperative Peer Editing to Develop Effective Economic Research Questions part of Examples
Students engage in peer editing and cooperative discussion to enhance research questions based on criteria designed to generate effective economic research questions.

Using Note-Taking Pairs to Enhance Understanding of Difficult Concepts (such as Income and Substitution Effects) part of Examples
A variation of the think-pair-share technique is used to reinforce understanding of the income and substitution effects associated with a price change.

Listening with Radio France Internationale: Des mots d'enfant pour parler d'autisme part of Examples
In this listening exercise followed by an in-class discussion students in intermediate-level French will work in pairs on comprehension exercises related to a recording of a young girl describing life with her autistic younger brother.

Listening Together: A Cooperative Learning Listening Exercise with Radio France Internationale part of Examples
In this cooperative learning activity,intermediate-level students of French will work in small groups on a language project concerning Alzheimer's Disease and the effect that it has on caregivers. The project begins mainly as a listening activity but ultimately includes all receptive and productive skills.

How Much Work is Required: Intuition vs. Mathematical Calculation part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Interactive Lectures:Examples
This classroom activity presents Calculus II students with some Flash tutorials involving work and pumping liquids and a simple question concerning the amount of work involved in pumping water out of two full containers having the same shape and size but different spatial orientations.

Volumes of Solids of Revolution part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Interactive Lectures:Examples
This write-pair-share activity presents Calculus II students with a worksheet containing several exercises that require them to find the volume of solids of revolution using disk, washer and shell methods and to sketch three-dimensional representations of the resulting solids.

The Crusty Loaf of Bread: An Exploration of Area of a Surface of Revolution part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Interactive Lectures:Examples
This write-pair-share activity for Calculus II students involves a hypothetical hemispherical loaf of bread with a 12-inch diameter that has been sliced into twelve one-inch-thick slices. The objective is to determine which slice contains the most upper crust (i.e., most area of its surface of revolution).

Impact of federal deficits part of Examples
Based on a fable about government debt, students identify the relevance of crowding out, monetizing a debt, external debt, and stimulus spending.

Counting GDP part of Examples
Working in small groups, students determine how 18 items are included in GDP (or if they are excluded.) Cards turned over one at a time encourage participation by all group members.

Economies of scale part of Examples
Working in groups of three, students analyze economies of scale. Each student constructs an individual short-run ATC curve, then the three students collaborate to determine if there are economies or diseconomies of scale and to create the long run ATC.

Riemann Sums and Area Approximations part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Interactive Lectures:Examples
After covering the standard course material on area under a curve, Riemann sums and numerical integration, Calculus I students are given a write-pair-share activity that directs them to predict the best area approximation methods for each of several different functions. Afterwards, the instructor employs a Web-based applet that visually displays each method and provides the corresponding numerical approximations.

Investigative Case - "European Starlings and Woopeckers" part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Investigative Case Based Learning:Examples
An exploration into Niche Competition and Population Ecology

Using Satellite Data and Google Earth to Explore the Shape of Ocean Basins and Bathymetry of the Sea Floor part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Teaching with Data:Examples
This activity is for an introductory oceanography course. It is designed to allow students to use various tools (satellite images, Google Earth) to explore the shape of the sea floor and ocean basins in order to gain a better understanding of both the processes that form ocean basins, as well as how the shape of ocean basins influences physical and biological processes.

Limiting Reactants: Industrial Case Study part of Examples
An exercise in which students apply limiting reactants, mass ratios and percent yields to suggest an optimum industrial process. Cost figures are provided but students are told to come up with, and defend, their own criteria for their recommendation.

Think-Pair-Share Activity for Understanding Price Controls part of Examples
An exercise designed to facilitate understanding of the impacts of price controls on market outcomes, with a follow up exercise covering these and related concepts.