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Interpreting the Geologic History of Canyon de Chelly part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Holly Godsey, University of Utah
The is a two part lesson designed to given in-service teacher an experience in field geology. The lesson is designed by Canyon de Chelly, AZ but can be used anywhere there are outcrops of two or more rock types.

Collaborative Research Project: Geoscience Undergraduate Curricula part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Barbara Bekken, Virginia Tech
Collaborative research project in which undergraduate geoscience curricula at Research 1 institutions are compared. This project uses the methods of science to explore a topic that beginning students can understand. This project uses rubrics for self, peer, and instructor assessment.

Lahar Risk Assessment part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Declan De Paor, Old Dominion University
Students act as first responders assessing Lahar risks associated with eruptions. Teacher sets an alert placemark on the Google Earth web browser plug-in and gives students X minutes to decide whether to evacuate a down-slope town. Students collaborate by text messages.

Calculating the radius of the Earth part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Basil Tikoff, UW Madison
Science students often have difficulty thinking about large spatial scales. The purpose of the exercise is to redo Eratosthenes' calculation of the radius of the Earth using data from to sites in ancient Egypt. The excercise teaches about the methodology of science - how Eratothenes figured it out - rather than worried about what the "right" answer is. It can also be used to discuss the role of models in geological thinking.

Evaluating the lines of evidence for plate tectonics part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Becca Walker, Mt. San Antonio College
In this in-class exercise, students compare several lines of evidence that support the ideas of continental drift and plate tectonics. Before the class meeting, each student is given a preparation assignment in which he/she studies one "continental drift" and one "ocean floor data" map. In class, students divide into teams of 3, with each team member having prepared different specialties. They discuss their respective maps and look for spatial patterns among the data.

Transport of heavy metals in the Clark Fork River part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Kathleen Harper, University of Montana-Missoula, The
This is an activity about transport of sediment contaminated by copper, arsenic, and other heavy metals that was deposited into the Clark Fork River channel as the result of historical mining activity. The Clark Fork River between Butte and Milltown, Montana has been the focus of several large superfund projects designed to address the impacts of this legacy of mining in the watershed. This activity is used in an introductory physical geology lab (primarily non-majors) with students who may have limited experience working with quantitative analysis and analyzing graphs.

Think-Aloud Modeling of Geologic Reasoning in the Field part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Steve Reynolds, Arizona State University - Downtown Phoenix
This activity involves explicitly sharing with students all the thoughts that occur to the instructor, as they occur, at a geologic field site. Assessment can be conducted with concept sketches.

Sea Floor Magnetism part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Kyle Gray, University of Northern Iowa
Students use compasses and bar magnets to simulate the collection of sea floor magnetic polarity data. Even though the students do not directly observe the magnets, they use the information to infer tectonic processes present at the mid-ocean ridges and calculate the spreading rates for two different ridges.

The Ecological Footprint Dilemma part of Integrate:Workshops:Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences:Activities
Bruno Borsari, Winona State University
How big is your ecological footprint? This case will assist students in quantifying this construct and allow them to reflect on life styles and alternative approaches that can help them reduce their ecological impacts.

Exploring Earth Systems Science: The Interactive GLOBE Earth System Poster part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Amy Ellwein, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory



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