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Learning Sustainability with Sim City part of Activities
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Making Sustainable Business Decisions In Four Different Industries and Their Effect on People (Social), Planet (Environment), and Profit (Economics) part of Activities
Walt White
The student will gain a better understanding of "Global Warming" and the "Triple Bottom Line" by viewing the first two videos. Further the CEO2 game will introduce many new ideas/options that specific industries have to select from in achieving their desired corporate/company goals.

The Sustainability Triangle: How Do We Apply Science to Decision Making? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Brian Naasz, Pacific Lutheran University
This writing assignment uses the "Sustainable Development Triangle" as a framework to critically evaluate an environmental issue of the student's choice. This learning activity provides an opportunity for an introductory chemistry student to use the sustainability's "Triple Bottom Line" as a tool to use material learned in the classroom to look at how environmental science helps inform economic and social/cultural factors in the development of sustainable solutions to our environmental challenges.

Science and Sustainability: A Freshman Seminar Course part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Steven Neshyba, University of Puget Sound
The backbone of the course is made of two books: Berger and Luckmann's The Social Construction of Reality and Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma. Students will discuss these readings in a seminar format, write papers, take exams, carry out a chemistry experiment using mass spectroscopy, and undertake a research project into current pedagogical approaches to science and sustainability.

Acidification of Freshwater Streams and Lakes part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Katy Olsen, Pierce College
Students research the acidification of freshwater streams and lakes, identify at least one of the sources, and determine how their daily activities contribute to the problem.

Integrating Sustainability Concepts into First Quarter General Chemistry part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Gerry Prody, Western Washington University
The goal of this project is to insert sustainability concepts and issues into the general chemistry curriculum. Specifically, I focus on carbon as the example to be considered throughout the quarter.

Researching Ocean Acidification in General Chemistry part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kalyn Shea Owens and Sonya Remington, North Seattle Community College
This research-based student project used the problem of ocean acidification to cover the sustainability concept of fossil fuel combustion and the disciplinary concepts of kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry and solubility.

Bottled Versus Tap Water: What You Drink and Why part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Marie Villarba, Seattle Central Community College
In the activity students learn about the properties of solutions, acidity and pH, electrolytes versus non-electrolytes, and solution concentration. Hopefully, this activity will also dispel common misconceptions about tap water and bottled beverages.

How Many Plants Make a Future? The Carbon Dioxide Challenge part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Rus Higley, Highline Community College Marine Science and Technology Center, Vanessa Hunt and Timothy Sorey, Central Washington University
This activity focuses on the role of photosynthesis in a sustainable future. Students explore the effect of photosynthesis and respiration in a 'closed systems' containing plankton, marine plants, and fish. By calculating carbon dioxide uptake and production in these systems, they predict a plant: animal ratio sufficient to maintain a system in carbon dioxide 'balance' for one hour.

Organic Chemistry: Friend or Foe? An Organic Chemistry Special Investigation part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Neal A. Yakelis, Pacific Lutheran University
Students are asked to work in teams to find a claim in the media relating to the impact of an organic compound (or class of organic compounds) on the environment and its inhabitants. Their chosen compound should have an effect on the sustainability of plant or animal life, or, in particular, the sustainability of human health.

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