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What's for Dinner? Analyzing Historical Data about the American Diet part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Jessica Libertini
In this activity, students research the historical food consumption data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to observe trends, develop regressions, predict future behavior, and discuss broader impacts.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City part of Activities
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

How Big is Your Breakfast Footprint? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University
Calculation of a carbon footprint resulting from common breakfast choices illustrates the importance of contextualization.

The True Cost of Eggs: Commercial vs. Local part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Caira Bongers

The Vital Role of Soil in Sustainable Ecosystems part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Midori Sakura, Cascadia Community College
In this natural science lab, students examine different soil profiles along a hillside. Understanding about topsoil formation and conservation is then related to sustainable agriculture and carbon sequestration and its importance in mitigating climate change.

Indigenous Food Relationships: Sociological Impacts on the Coast Salish People part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Ane Berrett, Nothwest Indian College
In this unit, students will analyze the macro level of societal influences which have interrupted micro level ecological relationship between plant and man. Sociological concepts such as sub culture, dominant culture, stages of historical change (Hunter Gatherer societies to Technological societies), stratification and poverty will be addressed through the sociological perspective. Students will experience solutions of sustainability which are interdependent with local place and people. Learning activities involve using the "citizen's argument," oral presentations, portfolio creation, written reflections and experiential service learning projects.

Delocalized Diets: Globalization, Food, and Culture part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Mary L. Russell, Pierce College
This assignment addresses cultural sustainability by asking students to go beyond distinguishing between five subsistence strategies to examining the impact of globalization on diet and culture.

Nature and Food part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Liz Campbell, Seattle Central Community College
In this activity students read articles or excerpts of books to explore the topic of sustainability in terms of food webs, roles of plants, animals, fungi, and bacteria and their own food choices. Students continue their exploration of these kingdoms with a visit to a farmers' market and a grocery store to compare locally grown foods and grocery store selections.

Skeleton Keys: Bonified Biology part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
J. Brian Hauge, Peninsula College
This series of exercises focuses on: the importance of observation in science; the proper use of scientific terminology and writing; the interrelationships between anatomy and position in a food web or energy pyramid; the biology of exotic species; toxins in the environment; animal use; and, the evolutionary significance of each of these topics.

Swimming Upstream: Relating Trapped Energy in Organic Hydrogenations to Use of Reduced Hydrocarbons as Energy Sources part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Shane E. Hendrickson, Wenatchee Valley College
An activity designed to inform the student of the potential and pitfalls of storing energy by the generation of reduced organic molecules, particularly as pertains to the generation of ethanol from molecules of a greater oxidation state and the ultimate fate of oxidized carbon when the energy potential is realized. As a part of a discussion of sustainability issues, the activity will be part of a discussion of global energy generation and use and couched in a form similar to the US energy flow trends.

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