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What's for Dinner? Analyzing Historical Data about the American Diet part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Jessica Libertini
In this activity, students research the historical food consumption data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to observe trends, develop regressions, predict future behavior, and discuss broader impacts.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City part of Activities
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Interviewing the Past: Developing a Sense of Place through Oral Histories part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Bob Abel, Olympic College
Local changes in climate, flora, fauna, and the human population can be anecdotally explored through interviews with long time locals.

Garbage Archaeology part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Gem Baldwin, Edmonds Community College
Students will look at the garbage we create as a culture in a deeper and more connected way and theorizing about the culture that creates and uses it. Designed for use in an online course, it could certainly be adapted for use in grounded courses as well.

Indigenous Food Relationships: Sociological Impacts on the Coast Salish People part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Ane Berrett, Nothwest Indian College
In this unit, students will analyze the macro level of societal influences which have interrupted micro level ecological relationship between plant and man. Sociological concepts such as sub culture, dominant culture, stages of historical change (Hunter Gatherer societies to Technological societies), stratification and poverty will be addressed through the sociological perspective. Students will experience solutions of sustainability which are interdependent with local place and people. Learning activities involve using the "citizen's argument," oral presentations, portfolio creation, written reflections and experiential service learning projects.

Native Plants, Native Peoples: Ethnobotany of the Puget Sound Bioregion part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Liz Fortenbery, Tacoma Community College
Students gain a small glimpse into a native knowledge system and the relationship between people and plants, and thus begin to develop or strengthen their own relationship to native plants and the Puget Sound watershed.

Wants Versus Needs part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Madeline Lovell, Seattle University
"Wants Versus Needs" is a two-part assignment given to students to encourage reflection on the materialism/consumption inherent in today's American society. This activity is designed to bring home to students the personal impact of materialism and advertising in America today.

Sustaining Indigenous Cultures part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Tori Saneda, Cascadia Community College
Student teams will research an indigenous culture focusing on issues of both cultural and environmental sustainability as they are related to modern development.

Climate Instability and Disease part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Clarissa Dirks, The Evergreen State College
The module was designed to introduce students to a variety of biological processes of infectious disease that are connected through human activities and climate instability.

What is the West? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Maureen Ryan, Western Washington University
What is the West? is a written reflective exercise, with associated readings and discussion, designed to 1) build insight into how personal experiences shape our perception of landscapes, 2) enhance knowledge of the geography and ecology of the American West, and 3) illuminate the role of water (or lack of water) in the natural and cultural history of the American West.

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