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Economics of installing Solar PV panels: is it worth it to the individual? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Martin Walter
We show that it is economical for an individual to install solar photovoltaic panels in Denver, Colorado; and this is a sustainable strategy for society at large.

Who Goes There? Estimating Ocean Populations in Chincoteague Bay part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Maria Hernandez; Itnuit Janovitz-Freireich
In this activity students use data to: rank species on the food chain, compute energy flow ratios and estimate fish populations in the Chincoteague Bay. Students also discuss the impact of the ecosystem and humans on this population, with an extension activity calculating the biodiversity of the system.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City part of Activities
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Using Debates to Engage Students in Sustainability Controversies and Conundrums part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Robert Turner, University of Washington-Bothell Campus
A primary feature of this "Water and Sustainability" course is a series of 10 debates on controversial sustainability topics. Each student in the course participates in one of the debates.

How Did This Landscape Form? A Field-Based Exercise to Enhance Awareness of the Natural Environment part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Lyn Gualtieri, Seattle University
In this activity students will investigate a landform (such as a waterfall or lake) in the field and apply the scientific method to come up with a geologic hypothesis. The focus of the activity is on making observations of the natural environment and fostering a "sense of place."

Acidification of Freshwater Streams and Lakes part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Katy Olsen, Pierce College
Students research the acidification of freshwater streams and lakes, identify at least one of the sources, and determine how their daily activities contribute to the problem.

Researching Ocean Acidification in General Chemistry part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kalyn Shea Owens and Sonya Remington, North Seattle Community College
This research-based student project used the problem of ocean acidification to cover the sustainability concept of fossil fuel combustion and the disciplinary concepts of kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry and solubility.

Transportation: Waterways to Interstate Highways part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Charles Luckmann, Skagit Valley College
Students practice open-ended inquiry, guided inquiry, synthesis and expository writing as they explore personal and public modes of transportation, past and present, in the Puget Sound bioregion. This activity can be adapted to any region.

Your Environmental Impact part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Eric Baer and Mayra Hernandez, Highline Community College
The following homework assignments are designed to build understanding of personal water use, sewage, waste generation and disposal, pollution sources and impacts, and energy use and costs.

Sound Science part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Peg Balachowski and Pamela Pape-Lindstrom, Everett Community College
An activity for a math/biology linked learning community in which students will collect, organize and analyze data related to the health of Puget Sound; experience the design of experiments in the sciences; apply mathematics to real biological issues that affect their lives; and develop an awareness of the personal and professional usefulness of mathematics, biology and modeling. Statistic students will act as consultants to the biology students and Biology students will in turn act as software analysts to help analyze trends as models are created.

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