SISL > Teaching Activities

Teaching Activities


Help

Show all pages

Current Search Limits

Sustainability Content

showing only Social & Environmental Justice Show all Sustainability Content

Results 1 - 10 of 44 matches

One day it is too hot and other days it is too cold. Do we need to replace the HVAC system? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Monika Kiss
This project will allow students to create a mathematical model to help in making decision about replacing HVAC units on a large scale.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City part of Activities
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Modeling: (1) Revenue Neutral Carbon Taxes; (2) Accelerated atmospheric C02 concentrations part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Martin Walter
Design a revenue neutral carbon tax and a plan for implementation; together with a model for what happens if we do not institute such a tax-system.

Seeing Sustainability part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kate Davies, Center for Creative Change, Antioch University Seattle
This assignment requires students to reflective observations of a particular place and to identify signs of sustainability and unsustainability.

The Sustainability Triangle: How Do We Apply Science to Decision Making? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Brian Naasz, Pacific Lutheran University
This writing assignment uses the "Sustainable Development Triangle" as a framework to critically evaluate an environmental issue of the student's choice. This learning activity provides an opportunity for an introductory chemistry student to use the sustainability's "Triple Bottom Line" as a tool to use material learned in the classroom to look at how environmental science helps inform economic and social/cultural factors in the development of sustainable solutions to our environmental challenges.

Critical Thinking on Sustainable Food Production and Consumer Habits part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Michael Faucette, Seattle Central Community College
Students are assigned to research, write, take a position and present it on the complex issue of sustainable food production and consumer habits.

The Sustainability of Place: Making Scholarship Public part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Jill Gatlin, University of Washington
Students are assigned to observe and research a local place of their choosing and to develop a unique analytical argument about the social and/or ecological sustainability of this space. The final project is a pamphlet directed to a public audience accompanied by a proposal for its production and distribution.

Toxic Hygiene: How Safe Is Your Bathroom? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Danielle Gray, Whatcom Community College
Students learn about potential safety and health concerns of personal hygiene products. Students examine labels and advertisements of these projects and then engage in rhetorical and cultural analysis of these advertisements.

Investigating Local Food: Meet Your Washington Farmers part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
June Johnson Bube, Seattle University
This assignment sequence seeks to stimulate students' thinking and writing about food production in the western Washington bioregion through a series of activities combining readings, class discussion, fieldwork, and writing assignments. Collaborative work in and outside of class culminates in students' interviewing local farmers and vendors at farmers markets and writing a surprising informative essay.

Mapping Place, Writing Home: Using Interactive Compositions On and Off the Trail part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kate Reavey, Peninsula College
Students will choose a physical place to study, a site that is close enough to visit at least four times during the quarter/semester. Using writing prompts, text-based research, and close observations in the "field" (the chosen place), students will create a "mashup" of spatially referenced pop-up balloons. These will include researched and narrative prose, citations and links, and some visual images, embedded into a map via Google Earth technology. Through this unique presentation, the research and writing can encourage viewers to better understand the place they have chosen to study.

1 2 3 4 5 Next»


« Previous Page      Next Page »