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How Big is Your Breakfast Footprint? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University
Calculation of a carbon footprint resulting from common breakfast choices illustrates the importance of contextualization.

The Costs of Your Commute: Your Money, Your Time, and the Earth part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Charlie Buehrle
This activity has students investigate their own cost, CO2 output, and time for commuting. They then compare their commute to an environmentally conscious alternative by using comparable metrics.

One day it is too hot and other days it is too cold. Do we need to replace the HVAC system? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Monika Kiss
This project will allow students to create a mathematical model to help in making decision about replacing HVAC units on a large scale.

Seeing Sustainability part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kate Davies, Center for Creative Change, Antioch University Seattle
This assignment requires students to reflective observations of a particular place and to identify signs of sustainability and unsustainability.

Bottled Versus Tap Water: What You Drink and Why part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Marie Villarba, Seattle Central Community College
In the activity students learn about the properties of solutions, acidity and pH, electrolytes versus non-electrolytes, and solution concentration. Hopefully, this activity will also dispel common misconceptions about tap water and bottled beverages.

Civic Stewardship and Interdependency: Rethinking Our Local Patterns of Consumption and Development part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Tara DerYeghiayan Roth, Seattle University
This "Exploratory Essay" writing assignment asks students to acknowledge themselves as stakeholders in their communities, to take a closer look at the urban or suburban town they call home, and to re-examine notions of entitlement.

Critical Thinking on Sustainable Food Production and Consumer Habits part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Michael Faucette, Seattle Central Community College
Students are assigned to research, write, take a position and present it on the complex issue of sustainable food production and consumer habits.

Toxic Hygiene: How Safe Is Your Bathroom? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Danielle Gray, Whatcom Community College
Students learn about potential safety and health concerns of personal hygiene products. Students examine labels and advertisements of these projects and then engage in rhetorical and cultural analysis of these advertisements.

What's Up With Your Stuff? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Holly Hughes, Edmonds Community College
Through a quarter-long series of assignments students determine their ecological footprint and explore their relationship with consumer culture. Students are given an opportunity to participate in a "service-learning" activity.

Building a Public Knowledge Base: The Wikicadia Node Assignment part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Todd Lundberg, Cascadia Community College
The center of this sequence of assignments is a collaborative, "New Media" writing project that involves publishing to a wiki a synthesis of knowledge about how humans inhabit places. Writers work in groups with others interested in a common sub-topic and develop information related to local places that local audiences who are invited to join the wiki may use.

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