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How Big is Your Breakfast Footprint? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University
Calculation of a carbon footprint resulting from common breakfast choices illustrates the importance of contextualization.

The Costs of Your Commute: Your Money, Your Time, and the Earth part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Charlie Buehrle
This activity has students investigate their own cost, CO2 output, and time for commuting. They then compare their commute to an environmentally conscious alternative by using comparable metrics.

One day it is too hot and other days it is too cold. Do we need to replace the HVAC system? part of 2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Monika Kiss
This project will allow students to create a mathematical model to help in making decision about replacing HVAC units on a large scale.

Indigenous Food Relationships: Sociological Impacts on the Coast Salish People part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Ane Berrett, Nothwest Indian College
In this unit, students will analyze the macro level of societal influences which have interrupted micro level ecological relationship between plant and man. Sociological concepts such as sub culture, dominant culture, stages of historical change (Hunter Gatherer societies to Technological societies), stratification and poverty will be addressed through the sociological perspective. Students will experience solutions of sustainability which are interdependent with local place and people. Learning activities involve using the "citizen's argument," oral presentations, portfolio creation, written reflections and experiential service learning projects.

Visualizing Social Justice in South Seattle: Data Analysis, Race, and The Duwamish River Basin part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Eunice Blavascunas, University of Washington
We examine the factors of race and environmental contamination, starting from the premise (and data proving) that race is not a biological, scientifically valid category, but a social, historical construction with real world consequences for equal access to health, resources, and power.

Exploring Personal Footprints part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Bev Farb, Everett Community College
Students apply the main research methods in sociology to explore their personal footprints (i.e., the global consequences of their individual actions).

Social Change and the Climate Crisis: Toward a Sustainable Future part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Mary Lou Finley, Antioch University
Students gain hands-on research experience and increase their understanding of the applicability of theories of social change and further information about climate change.

Sustainable Solutions for an Aging Population part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kathryn Keith, Pierce College
This activity will help students develop an understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of the lifespan, and in particular of the aging process; and, to further develop their ability to think long-term and multi-dimensionally as they apply anthropological concepts and approaches to a current issue in American society.

Wants Versus Needs part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Madeline Lovell, Seattle University
"Wants Versus Needs" is a two-part assignment given to students to encourage reflection on the materialism/consumption inherent in today's American society. This activity is designed to bring home to students the personal impact of materialism and advertising in America today.

Doing Sociology: Media Portrayals of [Over]Consumption part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Kayleen U. Oka, Seattle Central Community College
This assignment aims to illuminate connections among consumption/capitalism, media/ideology and the degradation of the environment. It also serves to introduce students to the data collection method of content analysis.

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