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Results 61 - 70 of 290 matches

Communicating Campus Resource Flows
Suzanne Savanick Hansen, Macalester College
Students research one of the energy or resource flows across the campus and design an educational project the describes the magnitude and importance of this energy or resource flow to the campus community for display during Earth Week.

Sustainable Solutions for an Aging Population
Kathryn Keith, Pierce College
This activity will help students develop an understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of the lifespan, and in particular of the aging process; and, to further develop their ability to think long-term and multi-dimensionally as they apply anthropological concepts and approaches to a current issue in American society.

Whats for Dinner?: Purchasing and Preparing an Organic, locally grown Meal
Craig Watson, Monmouth College
Student groups of five plan, research, prepare and serve each other a meal using naturally grown ingredients, then review and reflect upon the meal and the experience.

Story as a Place Happening Many Times: Imaginative Writing Activity
Nancy Pagh, Western Washington University
Students are encouraged to perceive specific locations within our bioregion as having a life that includes past, present, and future. These activities present ideas for wedding the teaching of "craft" with the teaching of sustainability.

Writing and Walking, Pilgrimage and Process: Working with the Essays of Linda Hogan & Henry David Thoreau
Rebecca Chamberlain, The Evergreen State College
By comparing and contrasting the essays of Hogan and Thoreau, students begin to develop a more complex understanding of their own identity and sense of place; the historical and cultural context around issues of sustainability and environmental ethics.

Using Reflection Activities in the Field to Deepen Student Learning
Holly Hughes, Edmonds Community College
This activity offers one of the reflection activities we developed in our learning community "Exploring Natural History in Word and Field." In this class, the students learn about natural history by reading natural history essays and participating in field trips. In this activity, we use reflection before and during a field trip to an Old Growth Forest to help our students clarify their own stance for a Position Paper on whether and under what conditions logging should be allowed in Old Growth Forests.

Meditation and Collection: "Garbage Reduction"
Gary L. Chamberlain, Seattle University
The course examines a number of unsustainable practices, the "worldview" or framework which emerged from the confluence of Christianity, the Renaissance and rise of modern science, and industrialization. We then examine new forms of Christian theological reflection leading to the construction of a framework reinforcing practices of sustainability and environmental justice.

Chemistry Laboratory Waste Evaluation
Tracy D. Harvey, University of Washington
From the scientific viewpoint, this evaluation will help the students see a process instead of just a data collection event, and they will get to practice estimating amounts. They will also need to determine the products of any reactions performed during the experiment. From the standpoint of sustainability, this evaluation is intended to help the student recognize the environmental "cost" of an experiment-in consumables used and in waste products generated.

Maps and Legends: (Re)placing Composition
Jared Leising, Cascadia Community College
Because maps tell stories, offer perspectives, and make arguments, maps also act as a metaphor for the writing assignments students are given. The writing that students do in this class creates maps to where students have been (writing stories from memory), where they currently are (writing profiles from observations of places), and where they're headed. This course approaches sustainability from the viewpoint of learning to value the places in which we live through listening to and telling stories about those places.

Energy Resources: Considering the Sustainability of Past, Present, and Future Resource Consumption
Molly Lawrence and Max Bronsema, Western Washington University
Students consider the vast amount of past and present energy resources in the world, their distribution, as well as the sustainability of their use. It introduces the idea of resource consumption and distribution to high school students.


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