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Integrating Sustainability Concepts into First Quarter General Chemistry
Gerry Prody, Western Washington University
The goal of this project is to insert sustainability concepts and issues into the general chemistry curriculum. Specifically, I focus on carbon as the example to be considered throughout the quarter.

Sustainability through Place
kathleen martinson, Luther College; Sonja Darlington, Education and Youth Studies, Beloit College

Meal Satisfaction and Sustainability for Psychology
Lee, Jen (Coe College) With Contributions from Kent Simmonds (Luther College) and Betsy Hutula (ACM)

Sustainable Public Health: Walkable Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes in the Bioregion
Jean McFarland, Edmonds Community College
Students generate hypothesis regarding the causes and consequences of obesity. Based on these putative causes and consequences they propose sustainable solutions (e.g. walkable neighborhoods, community gardens, etc.) that would be appropriate for and effective in their bioregion.

Where/How Do We Live: The Power of Ads and Sustainability
Arlene Plevin, Olympia College
This writing/thinking activity invites students to consider the power of advertisements and how they live in the world. Beginning with deconstructing ads, this activity has students appreciating the power of visual rhetoric and what strategies might be employed to persuade them. Students consider the cultural milieu of ads and the concepts of sustainability they promote (or don't).

Learning Sustainability with Sim City
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Seminar on Sustainability in Europe: What are the Limits of Possibility?
Mary Ann Cunningham, Vassar College
This field trip presents a model of an experiential exploration of sustainability systems and the limits of possible transfer of ideas from Europe to the US. In addition to experiential learning, our aim was to have in-depth, ongoing conversations in which to examine our assumptions and observations.

Race, Class, Gender and the Earth Crisis: Sustainability and Social Justice Meet
Dr. Cynthia Moe-Lobeda, Seattle University
Students work collaboratively to construct knowledge about the intersection of social justice and ecological integrity. Students will chose a consumer product that has adverse ecological and social justice impacts and develop a set of proposals for action that would challenge, dismantle or diminish those adverse consequences.

Exploring sustainability through water cycle connections
Tim Lutz, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
During this module students use multiple experiences (reading, video, the outdoors, a survey of their water footprints, writing, and lots of discussion) to examine how life today, in comparison to pre-industrial times, makes our connections to water virtually invisible. Students use the class's water footprint results to find out how agricultural and industrial water uses link us to people distant in both place and time. They weigh the consequences of these invisible connections in creating the lost sense of dependence and responsibility that typifies unsustainability. Students study the variability of water footprints within our class to help identify more sustainable personal choices. They consider the activity of a local watershed association to educate and involve people in improving the quality of local streams as a model of how community action can accomplish what individuals cannot.

Renewable - But Is It Sustainable?
Carol Burton, Bellevue Community College
Production of biofuels as an alternative energy source is not as simple as the media portray. This exercise enables students to practice critical thinking skills in evaluating the "value" of biofuels - a somewhat ambiguous concept.


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