SERC > Site Guides > Sustainability > Sustainability Activities

More Ways to Navigate

Projects and Collaborations
Find projects on which SERC is a leader or collaborator

Search all of SERC

Sustainability Activities


Help

Results 11 - 20 of 289 matches

The Sustainability of Place: Making Scholarship Public
Jill Gatlin, University of Washington
Students are assigned to observe and research a local place of their choosing and to develop a unique analytical argument about the social and/or ecological sustainability of this space. The final project is a pamphlet directed to a public audience accompanied by a proposal for its production and distribution.

Sustainability Buffet -- What's in a Definition?
Laura Webb, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College
This is an introductory activity to generate student discussion and provoke thought on the definition of sustainability.

River of the Dammed
Kallina Dunkle, Austin Peay State University
This activity is designed to engage students in an active debate about land use and planning, human populations, ecosystems, and sustainability by assigning every student to a "community" along a ...

Integrating Sustainability Concepts into First Quarter General Chemistry
Gerry Prody, Western Washington University
The goal of this project is to insert sustainability concepts and issues into the general chemistry curriculum. Specifically, I focus on carbon as the example to be considered throughout the quarter.

Phased Assignments in a Quarter-Long Argumentation & Research Course with a Sustainability Focus
Don Foran, Centralia College and The Evergreen State College
This teaching-and-learning activity is a phased process for developing a credible sustainability component in an Argumentation and Research course. The major assignment is a creation of an 8-10 page research paper in MLA format. All readings in this course are from the anthology, Listening to Earth (Hallowell and Levy).

Where/How Do We Live: The Power of Ads and Sustainability
Arlene Plevin, Olympia College
This writing/thinking activity invites students to consider the power of advertisements and how they live in the world. Beginning with deconstructing ads, this activity has students appreciating the power of visual rhetoric and what strategies might be employed to persuade them. Students consider the cultural milieu of ads and the concepts of sustainability they promote (or don't).

Meal Satisfaction and Sustainability for Psychology
Lee, Jen (Coe College) With Contributions from Kent Simmonds (Luther College) and Betsy Hutula (ACM)

Science, Complexity and Sustainability in the University of the Future
John Motloch, Ball State University
Series of seminars that build knowledge needed; and application of that knowledge to conceptualize a Regional University of the Future that could educate people to be societal leaders that help communities address the profound environmental, social and economic challenges of the present and future including: how to co-adapt with systems to produce an ecologically, socially and economically healthier world; how to live within nature's laws and limits; and how to help communities live within the dynamics of a place and culture to produce sustainable communities.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

Exploring sustainability through water cycle connections
Tim Lutz, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
During this module students use multiple experiences (reading, video, the outdoors, a survey of their water footprints, writing, and lots of discussion) to examine how life today, in comparison to pre-industrial times, makes our connections to water virtually invisible. Students use the class's water footprint results to find out how agricultural and industrial water uses link us to people distant in both place and time. They weigh the consequences of these invisible connections in creating the lost sense of dependence and responsibility that typifies unsustainability. Students study the variability of water footprints within our class to help identify more sustainable personal choices. They consider the activity of a local watershed association to educate and involve people in improving the quality of local streams as a model of how community action can accomplish what individuals cannot.


« Previous Page      Next Page »