SERC > Site Guides > Sustainability > Sustainability Activities

More Ways to Navigate

Projects and Collaborations
Find projects on which SERC is a leader or collaborator

Search all of SERC

Sustainability Activities


Results 101 - 110 of 332 matches

Wants Versus Needs
Madeline Lovell, Seattle University
"Wants Versus Needs" is a two-part assignment given to students to encourage reflection on the materialism/consumption inherent in today's American society. This activity is designed to bring home to students the personal impact of materialism and advertising in America today.

Sustainable Public Health: Walkable Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes in the Bioregion
Jean McFarland, Edmonds Community College
Students generate hypothesis regarding the causes and consequences of obesity. Based on these putative causes and consequences they propose sustainable solutions (e.g. walkable neighborhoods, community gardens, etc.) that would be appropriate for and effective in their bioregion.

Slight of Hand: Egoism and the Tragedy of the Commons
Ty Barnes, Green River Community College
Students are introduced to a theory in the Normative Ethics of Behavior (NEB) known as Hedonic Ethical Egoism. They will learn to present and explain the "Invisible Hand Argument for Hedonic Ethical Egoism" shown to depend on the following assumption: that the community as a whole is better off if everyone acts selfishly. This assumption is false as the "Tragedy of the Commons" will show.

How Many Plants Make a Future? The Carbon Dioxide Challenge
Rus Higley, Highline Community College Marine Science and Technology Center, Vanessa Hunt and Timothy Sorey, Central Washington University
This activity focuses on the role of photosynthesis in a sustainable future. Students explore the effect of photosynthesis and respiration in a 'closed systems' containing plankton, marine plants, and fish. By calculating carbon dioxide uptake and production in these systems, they predict a plant: animal ratio sufficient to maintain a system in carbon dioxide 'balance' for one hour.

Swimming Upstream: Relating Trapped Energy in Organic Hydrogenations to Use of Reduced Hydrocarbons as Energy Sources
Shane E. Hendrickson, Wenatchee Valley College
An activity designed to inform the student of the potential and pitfalls of storing energy by the generation of reduced organic molecules, particularly as pertains to the generation of ethanol from molecules of a greater oxidation state and the ultimate fate of oxidized carbon when the energy potential is realized. As a part of a discussion of sustainability issues, the activity will be part of a discussion of global energy generation and use and couched in a form similar to the US energy flow trends.

Delocalized Diets: Globalization, Food, and Culture
Mary L. Russell, Pierce College
This assignment addresses cultural sustainability by asking students to go beyond distinguishing between five subsistence strategies to examining the impact of globalization on diet and culture.

Sacred Meals: Food, Community and Place in Indigenous Traditions
Suzanne Crawford O'Brien, Pacific Lutheran University
This assignment focuses on the importance of cultivating awareness of the interdependency of people and place. This core concept intersects with a central big idea of the course: how subsistence traditions maintain reciprocal relationships between human and ecological communities.

Global Economic Inequalities: Microcredit Lending
Jim Zaffiro, Central College
Making actual microcredit loans to individual potential borrowers, in the context of an introductory international politics course.

Who Goes There? Estimating Ocean Populations in Chincoteague Bay
Maria Hernandez; Itnuit Janovitz-Freireich
In this activity students use data to: rank species on the food chain, compute energy flow ratios and estimate fish populations in the Chincoteague Bay. Students also discuss the impact of the ecosystem and humans on this population, with an extension activity calculating the biodiversity of the system.

« Previous Page      Next Page »