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Learning Sustainability with Sim City
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

An Experiential Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics: The Externalities Game
Susan Spierre, Arizona state university
The Externalities Game is a non-cooperative game that teaches students about the concept of environmental externalities and allows them to directly experience the moral dimensions of collective action problems. It ...

Unit 1: Hazards, vulnerability and risk
Brittany Brand, Boise State University; Pamela McMullin-Messier, Central Washington University; Melissa Schlegel, College of Western Idaho
Students will identify and apply credible geologic and social science data sets to identify local hazards and vulnerable groups and structures, and assess risk for their community.

Sustaining Indigenous Cultures
Tori Saneda, Cascadia Community College
Student teams will research an indigenous culture focusing on issues of both cultural and environmental sustainability as they are related to modern development.

Interconnectedness in The Upanishads and Upon Our Sheds
James Schneider, South Puget Sound Community College
In this workshop students gain understanding of the Hindu concept of monism and how it can be related to the sustainability concept of interconnectedness to classroom community as well as the natural environment on campus.

Writing and Walking, Pilgrimage and Process: Working with the Essays of Linda Hogan & Henry David Thoreau
Rebecca Chamberlain, The Evergreen State College
By comparing and contrasting the essays of Hogan and Thoreau, students begin to develop a more complex understanding of their own identity and sense of place; the historical and cultural context around issues of sustainability and environmental ethics.

Maps and Legends: (Re)placing Composition
Jared Leising, Cascadia Community College
Because maps tell stories, offer perspectives, and make arguments, maps also act as a metaphor for the writing assignments students are given. The writing that students do in this class creates maps to where students have been (writing stories from memory), where they currently are (writing profiles from observations of places), and where they're headed. This course approaches sustainability from the viewpoint of learning to value the places in which we live through listening to and telling stories about those places.

Twenty Miles from Tomorrow: Examining the Past, Present and Future of the Lower Kuskokwim River Delta
Lauren McClanahan, Western Washington University
This project involves pairing pre-service teachers with students in the rural Alaskan village of Eek in Southwestern, Alaska. By creating effective writing prompts, the pre-service teachers hope to better understand how climate change is affecting the people of this region.

Wants Versus Needs
Madeline Lovell, Seattle University
"Wants Versus Needs" is a two-part assignment given to students to encourage reflection on the materialism/consumption inherent in today's American society. This activity is designed to bring home to students the personal impact of materialism and advertising in America today.

Slight of Hand: Egoism and the Tragedy of the Commons
Ty Barnes, Green River Community College
Students are introduced to a theory in the Normative Ethics of Behavior (NEB) known as Hedonic Ethical Egoism. They will learn to present and explain the "Invisible Hand Argument for Hedonic Ethical Egoism" shown to depend on the following assumption: that the community as a whole is better off if everyone acts selfishly. This assumption is false as the "Tragedy of the Commons" will show.

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