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Results 31 - 40 of 165 matches

Using Google Earth to measure seacliff erosion rates
Alfred Hochstaedter, Monterey Peninsula College
This lab uses Google Earth to measure the rate of seacliff retreat. It touches upon coastal processes, natural hazards, and coastal management issues. The central focus of the lab is in the Monterey Bay area.

Evaluating Rainfall, Landslides, and Weather: Big Sur, California
Ana Garcia-Garcia, Monterey Peninsula College
This activity leads to understanding common landslide hazards in the area and how they relate to weather patterns and/or local geology.

Earthquake Compare and Contrast Paper
Sarah "Sally" Zellers, University of Central Missouri
Students will write a research paper comparing the Sumatran (2004) and Tohoku (2011) tsunami generating earthquakes.

Comparison of Two Hurricanes
David Kobilka, Central Lakes College-Brainerd
In this activity students synthesize ideas from lecture, reading, and viewing two PBS NOVA videos on hurricanes.

Investigating Earthquakes: GIS Mapping and Analysis (College Level)
Brian Welch
This is a college-level adaptation of a chapter from the Earth Exploration Toolbook. The students download global quake data over a time range and use GIS to interpret the tectonic context. -

Understanding flood risk at the community level
Lisa Doner, Plymouth State University
University level activity on floodplain risks. Uses FEMA maps and SERC river geomorphology videos.

VEPP: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - A Restless Paradise
Judy McIlrath, University of South Florida; Judy McIlrath McIlrth, University of South Florida
This is an exercise that is in development and has not yet been fully tested in the classroom. Please check back regularly for updates and changes. This activity is encompassed in a PowerPoint module (PowerPoint ...

Family Stress theories and risk communication to evaluate and build family resilience
Tatjana Hocke-Mirzashvili, James Madison University
In this activity, students use theoretical knowledge about family stress theories to analyze family vignettes and make predictions about the level of risk or resilience each family might have should a natural disaster occur. To increase resilience, risk communication strategies are discussed.

Ground Shaking and Damage at Your House
Carla Whittington, Highline Community College
In this activity, students use a seismic hazard map from the USGS to estimate the ground shaking hazard in their community. The map shows a 10% probability of ground accelerations reaching or exceeding a certain % ...


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