SERC > Site Guides > Earthquakes > Earthquake Activities

More Ways to Navigate

Projects and Collaborations
Find projects on which SERC is a leader or collaborator

Search all of SERC

Earthquake Activities


Help

Results 61 - 70 of 283 matches

ConcepTest: Location of Largest Earthquakes
Two ocean basins of identical size are almost surrounded by continents. The oceanic lithosphere below Ocean A is bordered by plate boundaries. The sea floor under Ocean B has a plate boundary running along its ...

ConcepTest: Location of Most Frequent Earthquakes
Two ocean basins of identical size are almost surrounded by continents. The oceanic lithosphere below Ocean A is bordered by plate boundaries. The sea floor under Ocean B has a plate boundary running along its ...

ConcepTest: Location of Shallow Earthquakes
Two ocean basins of identical size are almost surrounded by continents. The oceanic lithosphere below Ocean A is bordered by plate boundaries. The sea floor under Ocean B has a plate boundary running along its ...

Whose Fault Is It Anyway?
Eric Muller
This game has students simulate the propagation of P and S waves after an earthquake and to use the lag between these to determine where in the simulation the earthquake occurred. -

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

ConcepTest: Western U.S. Volcanoes and Earthquakes #2
The map below shows the plate configurations along the western margin of North America. At which of the locations would we be most likely to find the epicenters for deep (e.g. 300 km) earthquakes? a. A b. B c. C d. ...

Back-of-the-Envelope Calculations: Energy Released in an Earthquake
Barb Tewksbury, Hamilton College
Question A magnitude 8.5 earthquake (such as the 1964 Good Friday earthquake in Alaska) releases about 1x1018 joules of energy. The atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima released about 1.5x1013 joules of energy. How ...

Role playing the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake and trial to debate responsibility for communicating and understanding risks and natural hazards
Amber Kumpf, Muskegon Community College
In this activity, students reenact key events leading up to and following the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake and trial. This leads into a debate on responsibility for communicating and understanding risks and natural hazards.

The 2014 La Habra earthquake: Teaching Risk and Resilience in Southern California with Citizen Science
Danielle Sumy, University of Southern California
This exercise uses the example of the March 28, 2014 M5.1 La Habra earthquake to teach about earthquake risk and resilience in southern California. Students will examine seismic waveforms recording during the earthquake, as well as read reports from scientific agencies and news outlets to answer basic questions regarding earthquake risk and resilience.

ConcepTest: Western U.S. Volcanoes and Earthquakes #3
The map below shows the plate configurations along the western margin of North America. Near which of the locations would we be most likely to find a strike-slip fault? a. A b. B c. C d. D e. E

Earthquake Case Studies: Scientific Details and Societal Impacts
Matthew Nyman, Oregon State University
Learning outcomes for this activity include learning earthquake basics. The larger context of the inequity of earthquake impacts provides a social/environmental justice lens that encourages students to examine earthquake hazards with a broader perspective.


« Previous Page      Next Page »