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Introduction to Moment Magnitude
John Jasbinsek, California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo
This activity reviews body-wave magnitude, and takes a closer look at its merits. Then moment magnitude is defined and contrasted with body-wave magnitude. The 2004 Parkfield earthquake is used to illustrate moment ...

Explaining Seismic Hazard Probabilities
Mary Savina, Carleton College
This activity asks students to explain earthquake hazard probabilities to a lay audience of citizens, government officials and others.

Plotting Earthquakes with Near Real-Time Data
Bill Slattery, Wright State University-Main Campus
Students access the United States Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/ and plot the longitude latitude and depth of earthquakes on a physiographic ...

BotEC: The San Andreas Fault's Rate of Movement
Peter Kresan
Question: The San Andrea is an active fault zone, marked by frequent earthquake activity. The crust southwest of this strike-slip fault (including Los Angeles) is sliding to the northwest relative to the other ...

Field Trip to Explore Local Natural Disasters
Robert Clayton, Brigham Young University-Idaho
All on-campus Natural Disasters students at BYU-Idaho (1200 - 1800 students per year) go on a field trip to develop field observation skills. We visit the Teton Dam, Henry's Fork caldera (part of the Yellowstone hot spot track), and 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake area.

Developing student literacy on risk, resilience, and strategies for living with disaster uncertainty
Monica Gowan, Mayo Clinic
In this guided research and critical thinking activity, students prepare a research paper comprised of two parts: 1) a "state-of-the-science" review and synthesis of selected literature from risk and resilience research (provided) and 2) a brief critical appraisal of how current knowledge is (or could be) applied to building disaster resilience in a real-world scenario. Part 2 will be set in a student-selected hazard context (coastal hazards, flooding, or earthquake), employment sector (academia, government, private industry, services, non-profit), and geopolitical sphere of influence (e.g., Resilience to earthquake disaster in the student population at Universidad de Lima, Peru).

Evidence for Plate Tectonics
David Smith, GLOBE; Franklin Kao; Missy Holzer
DATA: Sea Floor Age, Volcano and Earthquake Distributions. TOOL: My World GIS. SUMMARY: Identify relationships among sea-floor age, earthquakes, and volcanoes to understand how they support the theory of plate tectonics.

Investigating Earthquakes: GIS Mapping and Analysis (College Level)
Brian Welch
This is a college-level adaptation of a chapter from the Earth Exploration Toolbook. The students download global quake data over a time range and use GIS to interpret the tectonic context. -

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Subduction Zone Earthquakes
David Steer, The University of Akron;
While working in groups to facilitate peer tutoring, students manipulate a hands-on, physical model to better comprehend several characteristics of subduction zone earthquakes. -

The Boxing Day Tsunami
Glenn Richard, SUNY at Stony Brook
Undergraduate students map data from the National Geophysical Data Center and the United States Geological Survey on Google Earth and study visualizations in order to explore the causes and effects of the Tsunami ...

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.


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