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Ground Shaking and Damage at Your House
Carla Whittington, Highline Community College
In this activity, students use a seismic hazard map from the USGS to estimate the ground shaking hazard in their community. The map shows a 10% probability of ground accelerations reaching or exceeding a certain % ...

Risk Assessment and Regulation in Christchurch, New Zealand
Patricia Stapleton, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
This activity encourages students to apply public policy and risk regulation concepts to the case of the Canterbury Earthquakes in New Zealand. Students review government websites, media reports, and first-person-narratives, analyze and evaluate policy responses, and consider alternate policy solutions.

Field Trip to Explore Local Natural Disasters
Robert Clayton, Brigham Young University-Idaho
All on-campus Natural Disasters students at BYU-Idaho (1200 - 1800 students per year) go on a field trip to develop field observation skills. We visit the Teton Dam, Henry's Fork caldera (part of the Yellowstone hot spot track), and 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake area.

Evaluating natural hazards data to assess the risk to your California home
Corrie Neighbors, University of California-Riverside
Students use a series of maps and natural hazard data to evaluate the risk to a building structure of their choice in the state of California. For each hazard, students rate the potential risk in two dimensions: (1) Probability - probability that a hazardous event "may" occur, and (2) Severity of Impact - the size of the impact in terms of cost and impact on human health.

The Geoscape of Bozeman, Montana
William Locke, Montana State University-Bozeman
This project was intended to build familiarity with the local geologic environment through a poster session leading to a single poster following the Canadian "Geoscape" model.

Calculating sea level changes
Shimon Wdowinski, University of Miami

Know Your Audience! Audience Analysis Exercise to Increase Audience Centered Communication and Teaching of Risk and Resilience
Carrie Nelms, University of Arkansas Main Campus
This activity will help develop critical thinking skills in analyzing an audience to customize a risk assessment communication message toward their needs. With climate change disasters becoming more prevalent,scientist will benefit learning an audience centered approach to deliver an effective risk assessment message to a multi-diverse audience.

Developing a Multi-Hazard Mitigation Strategy
This page is authored by Rebekah Green, Western Washington University.
As a culminating assignment in Natural Hazards Planning, students work in teams to create 15-year mitigation strategy for a selected jurisdiction using the FEMA 386 methodology for prioritizing mitigation options.

Town Planning using Geological Constraints
Tracy Furutani, North Seattle Community College
Students are divided into teams, each charged with writing a plan for the expansion of a fictional town in the North Cascades foothills. The town council (the instructor) has decided upon several expansion projects, such as an airport and housing subdivisions, and the student teams receive information about the bedrock geology, hydrology, soils, and slope stability of the area. Students present their plans in a open forum to the other students, and there is a vote of the students on the most reasonable science-based plan.

Learning Sustainability with Sim City
Sybil Hill
Sim City is a computer game that has the player design a city. They become the mayor. While designing the city from ground, they can choose sustainaiblity energy options such as wind farms, geothermal, and solar. The game includes greening options and pollution factors. Teachers in a variety of disciplines can utilize this to bring their core course concepts to life.

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