Evaluating Learning

[link # studenteval 'Student Evaluation'] | Course Evaluation | Assignments | SENCER-SALG

Student Evaluation

(Please see the commmon syllabus for components of student evaluation)

Course Evaluation

A.Assignments across the collaborating institutions

A major assignment was given to the students at each of the collaborating institutions during the Fall semester of 2007. A group paper was assigned that was to be researched and written by a team made up of at least one student from each institution. The team also had Kenyan consultants with whom they could email correspond with to help with data collection. After this assignment, a survey was given to the students at NCWC (n=20). The following results were found. Eighty percent (16 of 20 students) agreed or strongly agreed to the statement that they were reluctant about the assignment when it was first given; however, at the end of the project, 80% of them agreed or strongly agreed that the assignment was meaningful. Additionally 90% of the students (18 of 20) agreed or strongly agreed that the assignment was helpful to their learning about HIV. In relation to the group interaction aspect of the project, 65% of the students (13 of 20) agreed or strongly agreed that group projects are important in teaching how the "real world " works and 63% (10 of 16) agreed or strongly agreed that such group projects are valuable in providing experience that will be helpful after graduation. Some of the student comments were most telling as well. "Working with the Kenyans was nice; one gets to learn about other cultures and beliefs." "I think it was very valuable to work with students from other institutions because that is what the "real world" is like when you're working in science or in another business. It was enjoyable to communicate with someone from a different culture." "I liked hearing from the Kenyans. I think that was one of the most valuable parts of the assignment." Finally, a good summary quote from a student can be found with this email that was sent after the semester ended: "I wanted to let you know that although so much complaining surfaced over the course of the HIV paper, I know that people really did learn something out of that unique assignment. I feel like people will talk about it, listen for news on it and realize later on how much they appreciate the knowledge they have gained. We know you and the other professors tried to give us the best assignment possible, working with other schools and communicating with consultants from the other side of the world. Sometimes people forget that the most valuable lessons are derived from a little bit of hard work! So, thanks to you and the other professors for investing in us."

B. SENCER-SALG

During the Spring 2006 and Fall 2007 semester, the HIV/AIDS course was taught at North Carolina Wesleyan College (n=36) and Meredith College (n=54). The results from the SALG instrument are summarized below with statistically significant gains showed (p< 0.05; analyzed by t-tests).

Confidence Increases (t-tests significant at the alpha < 0.05 level)

NCWC (n=36)Meredith College (n=54)
Discussing Science: e.g. Discuss scientific concepts with my friends or family; Make an argument using scientific evidence to friends or familyXX
Understanding Media Issues/Popular Science: e.g. determine what is and is not valid scientific evidence in the media or understand scientific processes behind important scientific issues in the media; Think critically about scientific findings I read about in the mediaXX
Determine the difference between science and "pseudo-science" in the mediaXX
Explore and Understand Scientific Literature:e.g. Interpret tables and graphs; Find scientific journal articles using library/internet databases; Organize a systematic search for relevant data to answer a question; Extract main points from a scientific article and develop a coherent summaryXX
Engage in Scientific Process: e.g. Give a presentation about a science topic to the class; Pose questions that can be addressed by collecting and evaluating scientific evidenceXX

Interest or Likeliood Increases (t-tests significant at the alpha < 0.05 level)

NCWC (n=36)Meredith College (n=54)
Discussing Science: e.g. Discuss scientific concepts with my friends or family; Make an argument using scientific evidence to friends or familyXX
Civic Engagement Connections: e.g. Reading about science and its relations to civic issues XX
Becoming Civically Involved: e.g. Write a letter or email to a public official about a civic or political issue; Attend a meeting, rally, or protest about a civic or political issue; Write a letter to the editor about a civic or political issue; Write a letter or email to a public official about a civic or political issue & about a science-related issue; Debate or offer public comment on a scientific issue XX
Learning more about Topic:e.g. Reading articles about science in magazines, journals or on the internet; Read a science-related magazine not required by class X
Interest in Science and/or Teaching: e.g. Majoring in a science-related field; Taking additional science courses after this one; Teaching science X

Evaluating Learning

Evaluating Learning  2