SAGE 2YC > About This Project

About the SAGE 2YC Project

This website is the product of two awards from the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education. From 2011-2015, the SAGE 2YC project engaged 2YC geoscience faculty in a targeted professional development program focused on sharing successful strategies for teaching students with a range of abilities, experiences, and goals, and for preparing 2YC students for the geoscience workforce. Beginning in 2015, the SAGE 2YC: Faculty as Change Agents project is working to build a national network of self-sustaining local communities of 2YC geoscience faculty and administrators who use evidence-based strategies to improve all students' academic success, broaden participation, and facilitate professional pathways into the STEM workforce.

Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges

Two-year colleges (2YCs) play crucial roles in meeting the nation's geoscience and STEM workforce needs and in increasing public scientific literacy. 2YCs enroll over 45% of all U.S. undergraduates and serve a large number of women, minority, and first-generation college students. In addition, the 2YC teaching environment is one of the most challenging as community colleges are primarily open-access intuitions that serve an extremely diverse student body; teaching loads are heavy; there is an increasing use of adjunct faculty; and there is limited support for participation in professional development activities, widely recognized as the source for many critical improvements for improving student learning. The SAGE 2YC project seeks to make an impact in this important area.

Faculty as Change Agents

The SAGE 2YC: Faculty As Change Agents project will build a national network of self-sustaining local communities of 2YC geoscience faculty and administrators who use evidence-based strategies to improve all students' academic success, broaden participation, and facilitate professional pathways into the STEM workforce. A synergistic program of research and evaluation that is fully integrated in the project will advance knowledge and understanding of the effectiveness of a professional development model for full-time and adjunct geoscience and STEM faculty.

The project goals are to

  1. build a sustainable national network of 2YC leaders (change agents) who catalyze change at multiple levels from their courses to institutions in their local regions and within the community of practice;
  2. implement high-impact evidence-based instructional and co-curricular practices that support the academic success of all students, broaden participation, and promote professional pathways into geoscience; and
  3. investigate models of professional development for full-time and adjunct 2YC geoscience faculty that promote the cycle of innovation, where faculty learn from the research of others, make changes in their own practice, and share what they have learned with the education community.

The project's professional development program will prepare two cohorts of 2YC geoscience faculty teams to implement evidence-based instructional and co-curricular practices at their institutions. The inclusion of administrators will support systemic change at each institution. The faculty teams will expand the reach of the project by engaging additional two-year and four-year institutions in their regions using a combination of workshops and follow-on activities. On-line resources and virtual professional development activities will support faculty to implement changes on their campus, and will provide a persistent resource for the full geoscience and broader STEM communities.

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This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education through grants DUE 1122592, 1122640, 1122660, and 1122737 (for SAGE 2YC) and grants DUE 1525593, 1524605, 1524623, and 1524800 (Faculty as Change Agents).

Disclaimer: Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this website are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


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