Integrating Research and Education > Impacts on Native Lands > Crow > Study Guide > Questions for Further Exploration

Questions for Further Exploration

This page was written by Erin Klauk as part of the DLESE Community Services Project: Integrating Research in Education.

Open-ended questions allow students to explore scientifically significant questions while focusing on their own interests. Here are a few questions that are important to understanding the story of coalbed methane development on the Crow Reservation.

Questions Include:

  • How has/will coalbed methane development affect the culture of the Crow peoples?


    Crow wardancers. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn.
    This is a self-guided exercise for high school or undergraduate students, and could be applied in any environmental class or in Native American studies. This question can be further explored beginning with the resources found on the Cultural Heritage webpage.
  • Why did coalbed methane development begin, and why does it take place on the Crow Reservation?


    Row tribe members in front of a tipi. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn.
    This is a self-guided exercise for high school or undergraduate students, and could be applied in any environmental class or in Native American studies. This question can be further explored within the resources found on the Coalbed Methane webpage and the Exploration and Development History webpage.
  • What impacts could occur as a result of coalbed methane development?


    Eight Crow prisoners under guard at Crow agency, Montana. Photo courtesy of The National Archives .
    This is a self-guided exercise for undergraduate students, and could be applied in any environmental class. This question can be further explored within the resources found on the Environmental and Human Health Impacts webpage.
  • What (if any) policies have been put into effect to aid the people of the Crow Reservation, and what policies could aid in the future?


    Crow women in traditional Elk tooth dresses, one sitting and holding a baby. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn.
    This is a self-guided exercise for undergraduate students, and could be applied in any environmental class or in Native American studies. This question can be further explored within the resources found on the Policy webpage.

Images:
Image 1 - Crow wardancers. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn. Image 2 - row tribe members in front of a tipi. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn. Image 3 - Eight Crow prisoners under guard at Crow agency, Montana. Photo courtesy of The National Archives . Image 4 - Crow women in traditional Elk tooth dresses, one sitting and holding a baby. Photo courtesy of the Library at Little Big Horn.