terri plake

Science

Northwest Indian College

Workshop Participant, Website Contributor

Website Content Contributions

Course Module (1)

Water, Agriculture, and Sustainability part of Water, Agriculture, Sustainability
Water is the most critical substance for the sustenance of life, but the prognosis for the quality and supply of water resources in much of the world is somewhere between troubling and dire. This module provides a ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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Course (1)

Water, Agriculture, and Sustainability part of Water, Agriculture, Sustainability
Water is the most critical substance for the sustenance of life, but the prognosis for the quality and supply of water resources in much of the world is somewhere between troubling and dire. This module provides a ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Essay (1)

"I don't know what I don't know" part of Integrate:Workshops and Webinars:Teaching Environmental Justice: Interdisciplinary Approaches:Essays
Terri Plake, , Northwest Indian College "I don't know what I don't know," is often on my mind as I teach students at the tribal college in the Pacific Northwest. I believe that I learn as much ...

Other Contribution (1)

Terri Plake: Using Water, Agriculture, and Sustainability in Hydrology: Sacred Waters at Northwest Indian College part of Water, Agriculture, Sustainability
A Success Story in Building Student Engagement I teach at a tribal college in the Pacific Northwest. The module was piloted in an introductory hydrology course that focuses on our local hydrologic systems with emphasis on salmonid habitat. The course is an elective for the Bachelors Degree in Native Environmental Science and taken by students interested mainly in natural resource management. Class size is generally 5-8 students, however the module was piloted in a class with only 2 students enrolled. Students found the content of the module engaging, informative, and inspiring to exercise critical thinking in their work. The module covers content that is not generally found (yet) in mainstream textbooks but should be. This module fills a gap in content for instructors who want to build strong awareness about water sustainability through inquiry, statistics, and data. Activities brought to light critical issues about water that students "had no idea", inspiring deep critical thinking that lead them to action! The whole module could be taught in about 15-20 hours. Alternatively, if you are looking for an engaging activity(ies), most activities are easily adapted to fit into your course, I think especially suitable for any science, humanities, social science, economics courses where you want to enhance real-world issues and problems concerning water. Hands down the winning activity for my students was learning about virtual water through studying pizza (Unit 2 Water footprints, Activity 2.1a). Virtual water and water tied to commodities is very timely. Should we export crops that unit provides a solid foundation for engaging deeper in economics of water. Suggestions for adapting module for small class size: Some activities are set up very well for Next I highlight a few activities where I saw students truly engage in profound ways in their learning. cases in Unit 1 "Are we sliding into a water crisis?"

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Member of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers

Workshop Participant