Mike Clark

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Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (6)

Daisyworld: Interactive On-line PC and Mac part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Mathematical and Statistical Models:Mathematical and Statistical Models Examples
Students use a JAVA interface design by R.M. MacKay to explore the Daisy World model described by Mike Barnsley of the Department of Geography, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (see resources) . The JAVA interface comes with a link to a student activity page in PDF format. The following is a direct excerpt from University of Wales model description. "The Daisy World model is intended to illustrate a mechanism through which - according to the Gaian hypothesis - biota might optimize their abiotic environment by means of negative feedback. The model does not attempt to describe all of the possible mechanisms and feedbacks which might influence the ways in which the plants and climate develop. Instead, it is an heuristic model - one that seeks to describe the ways in which this mechanism might work. The original model was developed by Watson and Lovelock (1983)."

Trace Gases: Stella II Mac and PC part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Mathematical and Statistical Models:Mathematical and Statistical Models Examples
This Stella model allows students to learn about chemical mass balance in the atmosphere and apply this to atmospheric chlorofluorocarbon (important for ozone depletion) and carbon dioxide (important for global warming) concentration changes.

Energy Balance Climate Model: Stella Mac and PC part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Mathematical and Statistical Models:Mathematical and Statistical Models Examples
Students explore a Global Energy Balance Climate Model Using Stella II. Mac and PC archives with Stella Model (GEBM.stm) and Assignment in PDF format are provided. Students can explore how the model planetary surface and atmospheric temperatures respond to variations in solar input, atmospheric and surface albedo, atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, volcanic eruptions, and mixed layer ocean depth. Climate feedbacks such as water vapor or ice-albedo can be turned on or off.

Stratospheric Ozone part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Teaching with Data:Examples
Animations clips from NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio are used to help guide students through an introductory tutorial on stratospheric ozone. Students then explore observational data from ozone-sondes, TOMS, and UARS measurements to learn about changes in stratospheric ozone over the past several decades. Measurements and model predictions are also used to help students understand future stratospheric ozone recovery scenarios.

Daisyworld: Stella Mac or PC part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Mathematical and Statistical Models:Mathematical and Statistical Models Examples
Daisyworld is a very simple planet that has only two species of life on its surface - white and black daisies, and bare ground. Daisyworld is a good example of homeostasis and was first proposed by James Lovelock as a plausible example of his Gaia hypothesis. With guidance, students build a Stella model of Daisyworld from scratch. After constructing the model they perform guided experiments to explore the behavior of Daisyworld to changes in model parameters and assumptions.

Sun Spot Analysis part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Teaching with Data:Examples
Introductory students use Excel to graph monthly mean Greenwich sunspot numbers from 1749 to 2004 and perform a spectral analysis of the data using the free software program "Spectra". Short answer and thought questions related to the graphical data are asked throughout the assignment.