Todd Easton

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Economics Group, Pamplin School of Business
University of Portlnad

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activity

Foreign Exchange Rates: Solidifying a Student's Grasp of Supply and Demand part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Classroom Experiments:Examples
In this assignment, students think about four events that would affect a country's exchange rate. For each event, students complete three steps: a) deciding whether demand would shift, and if so, in what direction, b) deciding whether supply would shift, and if so, in what direction, and c) deciding whether the shift(s) in demand and/or supply would cause a shortage/appreciation or a surplus/depreciation. While completing these steps, students document their method for making each decision.

Other Contributions (3)

Documented Problem Solving: Adjustment of Output and Inflation to a Demand Shock part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Documented Problem Solving:Examples
In this macroeconomics problem, students check to see whether they understand the role nominal aggregate demand and inflation expectations play in determining the economy's output level and inflation rate.

Documented Problem Solving: Foreign Exchange Rates - Supply and Demand part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Documented Problem Solving:Examples
In this assignment, students think about four events that would affect a country's exchange rate. For each event, students complete three steps: a) deciding whether demand would shift, and if so, in what direction, b) deciding whether supply would shift, and if so, in what direction, and c) deciding whether the shift(s) in demand and/or supply would cause a shortage/appreciation or a surplus/depreciation. While completing these steps, students document their method for making each decision.

Todd Easton part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:About this Project:Project Participants
Associate Professor Pamplin School of Business University of Portland 5000 N. Willamette Blvd. Portland, OR 97203 easton@up.edu Phone:503-943-7209 Background Information I'm a labor economist interested in ...


Events and Communities

Developing Modules for Teaching Economics