Stephen Sweet

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Activities (4)

Does Gender Matter in My Intended Occupation? part of SSDAN:Activities
In this module students examine economic opportunity as it exists in their intended career, focusing on the specific occupation that they intend to enter. They examine the following issues: 1. Are women and men equally represented in your intended occupation? 2. If employment disparities exist between men and women in employment in your intended occupation, is the gap narrowing? 3. What explains gender gaps and trends in employment and earnings? In performing this analysis they learn how to calculate wage ratios, employment rates, as well as develop skills in creating and discussing graphic depictions of data.

Does Race Matter in My Intended Occupation? part of SSDAN:Activities
In this module students examine economic opportunity as it exists in their intended career, focusing on the specific occupation that they intend to enter. They examine the following issues: 1. Are racial groups proportionately represented in your intended occupation? 2. If employment disparities exist between racial groups in employment in your intended occupation, is the gap narrowing? 3. What explains racial gaps and trends in employment and earnings? In performing this analysis they learn how to calculate wage ratios, employment rates, as well as develop skills in creating and discussing graphic depictions of data.

Teaching Module To Demonstrate Race and Career Inequalities Are There Racial Inequalities Present in My Intended Career Path? part of SSDAN:Activities
In this module students use employment data from the 2000 Census concerning adult full-time workers (individuals age 25 and older who work at least 35 hours per week). The question they consider concerns overall economic opportunity, as applied to their intended occupation and the extent to which access to opportunity varies by race.

Teaching Module To Demonstrate Gender and Career Inequalities Are There Gender Inequalities Present in My Intended Career Path? part of SSDAN:Activities
In this module students use employment data from the 2000 Census concerning adult full-time workers (individuals age 25 and older who work at least 35 hours per week). The question they consider concerns overall economic opportunity, as applied to their intended occupation and the extent to which access to opportunity varies by gender.