shelia kennison

Oklahoma State University-Main Campus

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (2)

Taking-Risks While Driving: Are there Sex Differences part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Undergraduate Research:Examples
In this laboratory exercise, students carry out a naturalistic observation study in order to test the hypothesis that there are sex differences in risk-taking. The students are asked to consider whether men and women might differ in the frequency with which they engage in this risky behavior. The laboratory instructor explains that the question can be answered empirically using a naturalistic observation. The students are then asked to develop an operational definition of "using a cell phone while driving." A very strict set of guidelines are developed so that students will be able to make naturalistic observations without much doubt about whether the observed event counts or does not count as the target event. Students then leave the lab in pairs and observe slow-moving traffic on and around campus. The observations are carried out for 30 minutes. At the next laboratory session, they analyze the data using the Chi-Square Test of Independence and learn how to report the statistic and summary data table in APA style. For the following laboratory meeting, students prepare a research report using APA style. In doing so, they prepare a brief literature review, method section, results section, brief general discussion, reference list, and at least one table or figure.

Who Gets Help: A Field Experiment? part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Undergraduate Research:Examples
In this laboratory exercise, students carry out a field experiment in order to test the hypothesis that able bodied individuals receive less help than those perceived to have an injury. The laboratory instructor leads a lesson on experiments, independent variables, dependent variables, reasoning about causation, and extraneous variables. The students are then asked to develop operational definitions of "being able bodied" and "having a perceived injury." The laboratory instructor introduces inexpensive eye patches for students. The laboratory discusses how a person can immediately change his or her perception as an able bodied person by putting on or taking off an eye patch. Students then leave the lab in pairs with a box of pencils or stack of papers or stack of books. They stage opportunities to help by dropping the items near where people might help. One person in the pair drops with an eye patch and without an eye patch and the other counts the help given. Then the students switch roles. The observations are carried out long enough to get 5 helping events for each person in each condition (i.e., with eye patch and without eye patch). At the next laboratory session, they analyze the data using the Chi-Square Test of Independence and learn how to report the statistic and summary data table in APA style. For the following laboratory meeting, students prepare a research report using APA style. In doing so, they prepare a brief literature review, method section, results section, brief general discussion, reference list, and at least one table or figure.

Other Contribution

Shelia M. Kennison part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:About this Project:Project Participants
Associate Professor Psychology 116 North Murray Hall Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 shelia.kennison@okstate.edu Phone:405-744-7335 Background Information Dr. Kennison is a tenured Associate Professor of Psychology in ...


Events and Communities

Developing Modules for Teaching Economics Participants