Karen Gran

Earth & Environmental Sciences

University of Minnesota-Duluth

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (5)

Introduction to GIS through river meandering and landslide mapping part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Activities
The primary goal of this lab is to develop basic ArcGIS skills for geomorphology students and give them a taste of what is possible in GIS. The lab is written for the GIS novice, and thus includes detailed instructions for small tasks. The GIS basics are taught via an exploration of river meandering and bank and bluff erosion in a local (turbidity-impaired) stream in Duluth, Minnesota: Amity Creek. The students visited Amity Creek the previous week and mapped in all locations along the river corridor with clear evidence of recent landsliding. This lab leads them through how to bring those field-collected GPS data into ArcGIS to both create maps and make measurements. They also look at river meandering over time at a single site where recent bluff stabilization work was completed to slow channel migration and lower the amount of fine sediment from entering the stream. This lab could be adapted to other locations, although I have also included all of the data specific to this site.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Anthropogenic Effects on Erosion part of Cutting Edge:Geomorphology:Activities
This exercise investigates anthropogenic effects on erosion in two parts. The first is a discussion of a paper by Roger Hooke (2000) "On the history of humans as geomorphic agents." The second half expands on the concept of back of the envelope calculations to calculate volumes and costs of various human earth-moving activities.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Fluvial Landforms on Maps part of Cutting Edge:Geomorphology:Activities
This is an in-class exercise designed to A) give students more practice reading topographic maps, B) have students identify fluvial landforms on maps, and C) get students thinking about the processes that formed the features they see on maps. The exercise has three stations where students identify fluvial features and answer questions about chronology, climatic influences, etc. Then we move away from the "classic" maps to local topographic maps and students have to find several of the same fluvial features and describe them to the class.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Exploring hypsometry in glacial and fluvial environments part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Activities
This laboratory exercise explores the topographic signature of fluvial and glacial landscapes in different tectonic environments. Students develop a list of mountain ranges around the world to explore, then extract topographic data from 90-meter SRTM DEMs, and develop a series of hypsometric curves for each range. Each student works on a single range, but as a class we build up a database of 10-15 ranges around the world. The hypsometric curves are compared with each other and with published curves to look for signals of fluvial incision vs. glacial erosion in the landscapes.

Exploring topographic steady-state in Taiwan part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Activities
This activity is designed as both an introduction to GIS and an exploration of topographic steady-state. Students analyze DEMs from Taiwan to extract topographic profiles across the range. They reconstruct a series of datasets presented in Stolar et al., (2007), showing the progression of the range to steady-state as a space-for-time substitution from south to north. Students are expected to relate their observations from the topography to theoretical concepts discussed in class including accretion and uplift, steady-state, and critical wedge theory. An extension involves developing a simple numerical model in Excel of a mountain range as it progresses to topographic steady-state landscape, allowing students to investigate the rise of a mountain range to steady-state both from Taiwan data and from their numerical model.

Course

Geomorphology part of Cutting Edge:Course Design:Goals Database
This is an undergraduate geomorphology course, designed to introduce students to landforms and the processes that form and shape them.

Other Contributions (2)

Geomorphology part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Courses
Geomorphology is a mid-level core geology course, required for geology majors and minors. I teach it as a primarily field-based lab course, with one 4-hour lab and 2-50 minute lectures each week. One of my goals is to give students tools necessary to conduct basic research inquiries into geomorphology, with an emphasis on societal relevance.

Actively incising river evolution... in central Minnesota part of Vignettes:Vignette Collection
Karen Gran University of Minnesota Duluth Location Continent: North America Country: USA State/Province: Minnesota City/Town: UTM coordinates and datum: none Setting Climate Setting: Humid Tectonic setting: Craton ...


Events and Communities

Career Prep '05 Participants

Geomorphology Workshop 2008 Participants

Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014: Leader