Tun Myint

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Political Science
Carleton College

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (6)

Science of Post 2012 Global Climate Change Treaty part of Teaching Resources:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This assignment is designed to provide students: (1) to learn how to conduct the cost and benefit analysis of implementing science into public policy; and (2) to understand the challenges of implementing science into action in real world. In order to set the tone for the interplay of science and public policy as the focus of the assignment, I ask student to put themselves in the policy thinking of the President of the United States. This assignment requires student to identify top three credible scientific findings about the role of Green House Gases (GHGs) and Global Climate Change. Then students identify the most credible scientific finding. This science is the one tha United States government (or the team's selected selected country) is most willing to engage in serious negotiation after Kyoto Protocol is expired in 2012. Students then conduct cost and benefit analysis of implementing the most credible science into action for the United States or their selected country. In this cost and benefit analysis, students are instructed to look into top three GHG emitting sectors of the U.S. economy and respective country. Based on the findings, students issue policy recommendations for the selected country's position for the post-2012 climate change treaty. The central question students answer is: what scientific finding should be a guide to the post-2012 climate change treaty and how that climate change science and the political economic interests of five major emitting countries be reconciled so as to achieve a sensible and threat-thwarting climate change treaty after Kyoto Protocol expires?

Carbon Sequestration of Eastside Neighborhood Trees part of Teaching Resources:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This project seeks to investigate the science of carbon sequestration of urban trees so as to evaluate whether there would be potential benefits to the public for reducing GHG emission to the atmosphere. The central question this project seeks to answer is: how many trees are needed in the Eastside Neighborhood of Northfield, MN in order to absorb all carbon dioxide emitted by human activities in the residential area. In answering this question, the team will investigate social, economic, legal, and political dimensions of this carbon sequestration of trees in the neighborhood.

Mystery in Alaska: A Study of the 2000 Fishing Ban part of Teaching Resources:Quantitative Writing:Examples
What is the role of ecosystem science in the Alaskan fishing ban imposed in July 2000 in light of the concerns over the decline of Steller's sea Lions in Alaska? This question was unpacked in the documentary film broadcast on the PBS program Natureon August 24, 2008. This project investigates hidden connections between science and society related to the case by following through the documentary and answering three main questions: (1) how do the ecosystem and social systems interact and what is the role of this interaction in the decline of Steller's sea lions?; (2) can the July 2000 fishing ban be justified by the findings?; and (3) what hypotheses and theories of sustainability read about the the class (such as gaia hypothesis, DNA-centered view of life, cell-centered views of life, theory of emergent properties, complex adaptive system theory, etc) are tenable to explain this complexity or mystery?

Quantitative Review of a Political Science Documentary/Movie part of QuIRK:Curricular Materials:Quantitative Writing:Examples
For this assignment, students will select one of three movies/documentaries shown during first six weeks of the term. Students write a critical quantitative review of the documentary they select. This review essay should contain three components: (1) identification of key quantitative arguments and statements; (2) identification of key qualitative arguments; (3) analysis of how these key qualitative and quantitative arguments frame the central argument of the documentary. By investigating these three components, students will analyze the strength and weakness of the use of quantitative reasoning in the documentary.

Do Quantitative Indicators Make Qualitative Meaning?: Analysis of World Development Indicators, Human Development Indicators, and Happy Planet Indicators part of QuIRK:Curricular Materials:Quantitative Writing:Examples
In this assignment, a group of four to five students will select one country that has been ranked in the World Development Indicators of the World Bank, the Human Development Indicators of the United Nations Development Program, and the Happy Planet Indicator of the New Economic Foundation. Using the selected country's political, social, and economic statistics, each group will assess the methodology and validity of the measurements of WDI, HDI, and HPI indicators for the country. Students will compare and contrast the measurement methods, analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each indicator, and propose recommendations to improve these indicators.

Quantitative Review of an Article part of Teaching Resources:Quantitative Writing:Examples
For this assignment, students will select one academic article out of five designated articles which are also assigned readings for the course. Students will read selected article critically and write a review of the article. This review essay should contain two components: (1) the assessment of the author's main argument or thesis statement by reviewing how the author(s) uses both qualitative and quantitative evidences in the articles; and (2) the assessment of the use, misuse, and missed-use of quantitative evidences and the assumptions behind the numbers.

Courses (4)

Sustainability Science part of Integrate:Workshops:Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences:Courses
This course is conceived within the dual challenge of the need to understand how societal dynamics and environmental dynamics interact over time AND how they help induce or inhibit sustainability of social ecological systems. The course introduces students to theories, concepts, analytical frameworks, and research designs that will help us advance in understanding the dynamic relationship between societal changes and environmental changes.

Sustainability Science part of ACM Pedagogic Resources:ACM/FaCE:Projects:Integrating Sustainability into the Undergraduate Curriculum:Courses
This course is conceived within the dual challenge of the need to understand how societal dynamics and environmental dynamics interact over time AND how they help induce or inhibit sustainability of social ecological systems. The course introduces students to theories, concepts, analytical frameworks, and research designs that will help us advance in understanding the dynamic relationship between societal changes and environmental changes.

International Environmental Politics and Policy part of ACM Pedagogic Resources:ACM/FaCE:Projects:Integrating Sustainability into the Undergraduate Curriculum:Courses
This course covers five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and dynamics of international environmental issues and political processes: (1) international political orders; (2) international environmental law; (3) human-environmental interactions through market and politics; (4) political and societal challenges of sustainability; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. In addition to readings and discussions, students complete three projects related to specific case studies.

Sustainability Science part of QuIRK:Courses
The continual existence and betterment of humankind depends on the ability and intellect of human beings to make educated choices (rightly understood) in living with nature and to govern themselves. At the center of this challenge for human beings in the age of Anthropocene is the need for systematic and scientific understanding of how the dynamic relationship between societal changes and environmental changes influence change, adaptation, and evolution of coupled human-environment systems. This seminar will introduce students to theories, concepts, analytical frameworks, and research designs that will help us advance in understanding the dynamic relationship between societal changes and environmental changes.


Events and Communities

InTeGrate Sustainability Courses Workshop July 2012