Les Hasbargen

Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

SUNY College at Oneonta

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (5)

Meander Migration in the Amazon Basin part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Activities
This activity is targeted at introductory to upper division undergraduate courses in geomorphology or Earth system science. Students view time series animation of satellite imagery of part of the Amazon River basin (Rio Ucayali) which is actively migrating. Students are asked to describe verbally and with sketches the changes in channel location and channel features over time. They then compare the very active section of the river with other rivers nearby to get a sense of overall activity of meandering streams. This is prelude to hypothesis development and testing: why is the Rio Ucayali so active? Students explore some potential causes to explain the cause of lateral mobility of this river.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Hydraulic Geometry and Channel Roughness part of Cutting Edge:Geomorphology:Activities
In this field exercise, students measure channel cross sections in a rough (alluvial) and smooth bedrock-floored reach in a local stream. The students test the hypothesis that increasing roughness decreases average stream velocity, and so the depth and/or width must increase for the rougher bed.Students gain insight into how bank and bed roughness influences water flow, and thus can also influence flood heights.

Mapping Bedrock Outcrops with Stride & Compass and a GPS Unit in a soil and forest mantled landscape part of Cutting Edge:Geoscience in the Field:Activities
Students take a two mile hike along a trail in a forest and map bedrock exposures. The project takes place over a few days. Students will need 2-3 hours to collect the data in the field, and another 2-3 hours to create a digital map in the lab.

Diagnosing Landslide Hazard part of Cutting Edge:Geomorphology:Activities
Students investigate an active complex landslide with the purpose of characterizing the risk to nearby infrastructure. Students gain experience with field observation, mapping, and report writing. In addition, students learn key geologic and hydrologic controls on landslides.

Glacial Evidence in the Andes Mountains, Peru part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Activities
This exercise brings the students to a landscape in the Peruvian Andes in Google Earth, where some alpine and niche glaciers still exist. Their task is to determine glacial extent in the past, and infer the kind of glacier(s) that had existed in the area. In order to answer the question, students need to identify the current ice extent, approximate the equilibrium line altitude based on dirty vs white ice (or the firn line, if visible) in summer time imagery, and document glacial landforms. They also need to recognize the correspondence between elevation and ice extent. Key words: glaciers, glacial landforms, Google Earth

Course

Geomorphology part of Cutting Edge:Course Design:Goals Database
explores the shape of the land, and the various processes (that is, mechanisms) which are responsible for that shape. At first glance interpreting the shape of the land in terms of the dominant process might seem obvious and simplistic, but there are so many interacting systems (tectonic activity, climate, rock types, biological processes, chemical processes, erosional processes of wind, wave, and running water) that the exercise of relating process to form is not always an easy one. Clearly, geomorphology is an interdisciplinary science, so you will have a chance to apply much that you have learned in other Earth Science courses to geomorphology. We will begin with a broader framework for geomorphology (linking process activity with geologic, tectonic, and climatic settings, and time). Then we will dive into Earth's active processes: mass movements, rivers, waves, wind, and ice.

Other Contributions (2)

Geomorphology part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014:Courses
The course explores the shape of the land, and the various processes and influences which are responsible for that shape. These include tectonic activity, climate, rock types, biological processes, chemical processes, erosional processes of wind, waves, flowing ice (glaciers) and running water (from overland flow to rivers and drainage basins).

Climate, Uplift, Erosional Processes and Landscape Form: Clues from Physical Experiments part of Vignettes:Vignette Collection
Les Hasbargen SUNY College at Oneonta Location UTM coordinates and datum: none Setting Climate Setting: none Tectonic setting: none Type: Process Click the images for a full-sized view. Description Erosional ...


Events and Communities

Geomorphology Workshop 2008 Participants

Teaching Geoscience in the Field in the 21st Century Participants

Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Paleontology 2014