chuck connor

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Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (7)

What is the Relationship between Lava Flow Length and Effusion Rate at Mt Etna? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students use data from active lava flows to search for a relationship between effusion rate and lava flow length. Students will view a video of an eruption of Mount Etna volcano and make estimations of the rate of effusion. Using linear regression, the student will create a physical model to calculate the maximum potential lava flow length. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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What is the Volume of the 1992 Eruption of Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students are asked to calculate the volume of the 1992 eruption of Cerro Negro volcano, Nicaragua. An exponential thinning model is used to estimate the change in deposit thickness with distance from the vent. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Porosity and Permeability of Magmas part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students will consider porosity and permeability of a magma and the means that gas may escape the magma. They will use iteration to calculate ideal values for porosity, pressure, and volume. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

How Do We Estimate Magma Viscosity? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students look at how magma viscosity is affected by temperature, fraction of crystals, and amount of water present. They will be introduced to Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity as well as the Arrhenian model for viscosity. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

How are Flow Conditions in Volcanic Conduits Estimated? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students will examine flow conditions in volcanic conduits. Laws of conservation of mass and momentum are used to estimate variations in magma density and velocity. Students will use simplified equations of state to model steady-state Plinian eruptions. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

How Do We Estimate Melt Density? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students will use the thermodynamic properties of silicates to estimate melt density at high temperatures and pressures. Students will sum the mole fractions of several different oxides, with different densities, to calculate the total density of the melt. The molar volume and compressibility of each oxide will also be factored in the total melt density. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.

What is the Volume of a Debris Flow? part of Pedagogy in Action:Partners:Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum:Physical Volcanology:Examples
In this Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum activity, students will learn a method by which to estimate the volume of volcanic deposits using data collected from the 2005 Panabaj, Guatemala debris flow. Students will estimate the area inundated by this debris flow and an average flow thickness in order to estimate the volume of the deposit. From this volume, the saturated flow volume may be estimated by examining high water marks on buildings. This is a self-paced activity in which students follow a PowerPoint presentation to create spreadsheets and graphs using Excel.