Betsy Youngman

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (5)

Is Greenland Melting? part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:GreenlandMelt
Greenland melt extents in 1992 and in 2002. Image courtesy of Konrad Steffen and Russell Huff, CIRES. In this chapter you will use My World GIS to explore data that characterize the dynamic Greenland Ice Sheet. Begin by examining photographs, map views, and tabular data. Gain an understanding of how and why scientists are monitoring the ice sheet and what they are finding. Explore map layers that represent ice sheet thickness, weather station locations, and annual melt extents of the ice sheet. View images of the working conditions that Arctic scientists must endure to collect their data, and learn how sensors on satellites are used to gather information from an area as large as Greenland. Gain knowledge about scientists' methods for measuring the glacial ice flowing from Greenland's ice sheet to the coasts, and examine that data to learn how fast the ice is moving.

CLEAN Selected This activity has been selected for inclusion in the CLEAN collection.
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Detecting El Niño in Sea Surface Temperature Data part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:PMEL
SST anomalies for December 1997 displayed in My World GIS. Red indicates above average temperatures compared to average SST temperatures for December data averaged over the years 1982-1998. This chapter introduces you to normal seasonal sea surface temperature (SST) variation as well as extreme variation, as in the case of El Niño and La Niña events, in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. You will learn how to download seasonal SST data from the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), via a THREDDS server, for the years 1982 to 1998. With My World GIS, you will visualize and analyze that data, looking for the tell-tale SST signature of El Niño and La Niña events that occurred during that time period. At the conclusion of the chapter, you will be given the opportunity to analyze a season of your own choosing to determine if an El Niño and La Niña SST pattern emerged in that year's data.

CLEAN Selected This activity has been selected for inclusion in the CLEAN collection.
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Drought: Unit Overview part of EarthLabs:Drought
Drought is an ever-present threat to all people whose lifestyles have been built on the availability of water. Across the planet, millions of humans make their homes and grow crops in areas that receive minimal amounts of precipitation. In this EarthLabs module students learn that when precipitation drops below normal, drought conditions can develop and economic, environmental, and social impacts can follow. The unit teaches students to interpret climate data to recognize the symptoms and evaluate the severity of drought. The unit raises awareness of the need to be prepared to face drought conditions that may become more common as our planet warms.

Drought Unit Overview part of EarthLabs for Educators:Drought
Drought is an ever-present threat to all people whose lifestyles have been built on the availability of water. Across the planet, millions of humans make their homes and grow crops in areas that receive minimal amounts of precipitation. In this EarthLabs module students learn that when precipitation drops below normal, drought conditions can develop and economic, environmental, and social impacts can follow. The unit teaches students to interpret climate data to recognize the symptoms and evaluate the severity of drought. The unit raises awareness of the need to be prepared to face drought conditions that may become more common as our planet warms.

Whither Arctic Sea Ice? part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:SeaIce
This image, produced in Image J, shows the thresholded sea ice extents. In this chapter, you will take on the role of a student from a small town in Colorado. You will then team up with students from the town of Churchill, Canada to explore changing sea ice conditions in the Arctic. Examine an animation that shows 30 years of satellite images to see how the extent of sea ice in the Arctic has diminished over time. Next, you will measure the extent of the sea ice in November of each year, import your measurements into Microsoft Excel, create a graph, and interpret it to predict when the sea ice will be completely gone. Download and graph temperature data for the same time period and look for potential causes of the change in sea ice extent. Last, you will apply your new image processing and analysis skills to research the changing sea ice extents in other regions of the Arctic. This chapter's storyline is built around the real-life case study of Dr. Walt Meier, a Sea Ice Scientist from Boulder, Colorado. In the fictional story, the students of Churchill become concerned about wildlife in their region because polar bears have become a nuisance in the town. According to the local elders, the sea ice patterns have changed. The students turn to Dr. Meier for his expertise in sea ice analysis. Dr. Meier then instructs the students in the use of ImageJ and guides them through the research process.

CLEAN Selected This activity has been selected for inclusion in the CLEAN collection.
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Events and Communities

Using Data in the Classroom Workshop 2009 Participants

Access Data Citizen Science Workshop