Charles Dodd

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Geography
Shoreline Community College

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (2)

Designing a Biological Community part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
In this Physical Geography Lab, students are responsible for designing a simple biological community. Students are provided abiotic environmental conditions specific to certain geographic areas. Students then design a community of decomposers, producers and consumers. Students are required to select appropriate species from a list provided to them consistent within the constraints of food avalibility within their community and the abiotic conditions of their environment. Students are required to identify and describe trophic structure, different interspecific relationships, biomass patterns as well as keystone species if relevant. This assignment places emphasis on the aboitic components of climate and its role in influencing biological communities.

Genetic and Empirical Approaches to Classifying Climates part of Quantitative Skills:Activity Collection
Students (in groups of 3-4) are given a hypothetical planet and create a genetically based climate regionalization taking into account various climate factors (seasonal insolation, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, distance from moisture sources etc.). Students then interpret empirical data of various climate phenomena (precipitation, temperature, evapo-transpiration) from different locations on the planet and apply these to the Koppen system of climate classification.

Courses (3)

Cartography, Landforms and Landform Analysis part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
Geography 205 is an introductory course to physical geography. This course, the first of a two course series (the other is Geography 206: Weather, Climate and Ecosystems) for Physical Geography at Shoreline Community College. The course focuses on the formal study of the earth's surface and the various physical systems that interact with, and shape, its surface. Particular attention is given to the earth's landforms, including formation processes, interpretation and representation. These topics will be presented within the context of a global, North American and local (Pacific Northwest and the Puget Sound) perspective. In addition to the emphasis placed on map interpretation, some emphasis is also placed on graphic and statistical data interpretation.

Weather, Climate and Ecosystems part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
Geography 206 is an introductory course to physical geography. This course is the second of a two-course series (the other is Geography 205 - Cartography, Landforms and Landform Analysis) for Physical Geography at Shoreline Community College). Physical geography is the study of the earth's surface and the various physical systems that interact with and shape its surface. In this course, particular attention will be given to the earth's atmospheric and ecological systems, including fundamental processes, their distribution as well as their measurement and representation. These topics will be presented within the context of a global, North American and local (Pacific Northwest and the Puget Sound) perspective. In addition to the emphasis placed on map interpretation, some emphasis will also be placed on graphic and statistical data interpretation.

Introduction to Earth Systems Science part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
This course is an introduction to Earth Systems Science. Earth Systems Science is the study of the complex interrelationships between materials and energy in the atmosphere and in the solid, fluid, and living Earth. Systems Science also involves the study of human interactions with these natural systems. In this course, we will investigate the fundamental processes that drive these systems, focusing on the measurement and representation, and response to change over time. These topics will be presented within the context of a global perspective. During the course we will solve quantitative problems and use mathematical models to describe and assess the impact of humans on Earth's systems. In the lab, we will have an opportunity to observe, measure, and model these systems. The lab activities will be presented in the framework of problems to be solved, and will involve critical thinking in addition to using the language of mathematics. To help us evaluate the interactions between Earth's systems, we will become familiar with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and the STELLA Earth systems simulation software.


Events and Communities

Infusing Quantitative Literacy into Introductory Geoscience Courses Workshop Participants

GSA 2013 Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges