Larry Lemke

Geology

Wayne State University

 Lawrence D. Lemke is an Associate Professor of Geology and Director of the Environmental Science Program at Wayne State University.  Larry earned a B.S. in Geology from Michigan State University, an M.S. in Geosciences from the University of Arizona, an M.B.A. from the University of Denver, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan. His educational and professional career path carried him around the world prior to returning him to Detroit, the city where he was born.  Larry spent 12 years working for Exxon and its subsidiaries exploring for oil and gas in the Rocky Mountains, the Gulf of Mexico, the North Sea, and The Peoples’ Republic of China.  At Wayne State, his research investigates the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater, air, and soil, with particular emphasis on human health and exposure risks in urban environments.

Larry has been honored as a University of Michigan Teaching Fellow, and has received recognition for his achievements as a teacher-scholar including an NSF CAREER Award, a WSU Career Development Chair, a WSU College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Teaching Award, and a WSU Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching.  Since joining the WSU faculty in 2003, Larry has served as a research mentor to 9 graduate and 35 undergraduate students, co-authored nearly 30 peer-reviewed articles and technical reports, and developed teaching materials in hydrogeology, sedimentology, and environmental geology.  Three of his peer-reviewed contributions to the NSF On-the-Cutting-Edge teaching collection received ‘Exemplary’ ratings.

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (7)

When Does Aquifer Heterogeneity Matter? Predicting the Influence of Alternative Conceptual Models on Contaminant Plume Migration part of Cutting Edge:Hydrogeology:Activities
In this classroom activity, students are given two alternative conceptualizations of aquifer/aquitard distributions in a glacial aquifer system and asked to predict differences in the migration of contaminant plumes in response to remedial pumping.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Pre-assessment: Gauging students' preparedness for Sedimentary Geology part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Activities
This activity presents a process for assessing (1) students' educational background and field experience related to sedimentary geology, and (2) students' familiarity with selected concepts and terminology of sedimentary geology and their ability to apply simple mathematical skills to relevant problems.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Mixing oil and water: Reinforcing groundwater concepts through comparisons with petroleum migration part of Cutting Edge:Hydrogeology:Activities
A guided brainstorming exercise for discovering similarities and differences between groundwater flow and oil migration. It provides an opportunity for students to make connections between hydrogeology and petroleum geology applications and to consider controls on single and multiphase flow fluid behavior in porous media.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Demystifying the Equations of Sedimentary Geology part of Cutting Edge:Sedimentary Geology:Activities
This activity includes three strategies to help students develop a deeper comfort level and stronger intuitive sense for understanding mathematical expressions commonly encountered in sedimentary geology. Each can be readily adapted to almost any course in Geology or Environmental Science.

Urban Environmental Excursions: Field trips to connect urban geology students with the world around them part of Cutting Edge:Urban Geology:Activities
Environmentally-themed field trips in urban areas can stimulate student interest in geology and environmental science while providing curricular links to topics such as global warming, energy resources, water quality, or environmental justice and the role of science in political decision making. This example describes a field trip about energy.

What's Cooking in Geology? Food Analogies and Demonstrations to Connect Geology with Everyday Experiences part of Activity Ideas
By Larry Lemke, Annia Fayon, Cristina de Campos, and Rebecca Boger Topic: Numerous Connection Areas: Structural Geology Magma Dynamics Viscosity and Volcanic Eruption Style Oil Spills Glacial Motion Plate ...

Paper or Plastic? Recognizing Environmental Tradeoffs part of Activity Ideas
Lawrence D. Lemke Wayne State University Topic: Environmental Geology Natural Resources Energy Course Type:intro upper level Description In this activity students explore the tradeoffs inherent in almost every ...


Events and Communities

Sedimentary Geology Workshop 06

Urban Geology Workshop 2008 Participants

Hydrogeology Workshop 2005

Teaching Environmental Geology 2012