Jim Washburne

Hydrology and Water Resources

The University of Arizona

Workshop Participant, Website Contributor

Website Content Contributions

Course Modules (5)

Module 4: Land-atmosphere exchange part of Critical Zone Science
Jim Washburne (The University of Arizona) Summary and Overview Energy and carbon fluxes and budgets provide both the energy and raw materials for many of the processes taking place in the Critical Zone, ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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Unit 7.1 - Model My Watershed part of Critical Zone Science
Humans are agents of change in the Critical Zone. This unit focuses on the land/water connection and on how human-induced land use change affects local hydrology. Students will apply what they learned in the ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Unit 4.1 - Energy Budgets part of Critical Zone Science
The purpose of this unit is to explore, compare, contrast, and calculate energy fluxes from different CZO field sites to better appreciate the critical differences in the driving radiative forces affecting each ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Unit 4.2 - Carbon Budgets part of Critical Zone Science
The purpose of this unit is to explore, compare, contrast, and interpret carbon fluxes from the Ameriflux network to better appreciate the critical factors that account for the different timing and magnitudes of ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Module 7: Humans in the Critical Zone part of Critical Zone Science
Susan Gill (Stroud Water Research Center), Ashlee Dere (University of Nebraska - Omaha), and Jim Washburne (Pima Community College and University of Arizona) Summary and Overview All humans live in the Critical ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Activities (3)

Unit 7.1 - Model My Watershed part of Critical Zone Science
Humans are agents of change in the Critical Zone. This unit focuses on the land/water connection and on how human-induced land use change affects local hydrology. Students will apply what they learned in the ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Unit 4.1 - Energy Budgets part of Critical Zone Science
The purpose of this unit is to explore, compare, contrast, and calculate energy fluxes from different CZO field sites to better appreciate the critical differences in the driving radiative forces affecting each ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Unit 4.2 - Carbon Budgets part of Critical Zone Science
The purpose of this unit is to explore, compare, contrast, and interpret carbon fluxes from the Ameriflux network to better appreciate the critical factors that account for the different timing and magnitudes of ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
Learn more about this review process.

Course (1)

HWR203 - Arizona Water Issues part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Course Design:Goals Database
Students will research and discuss a wide range of topics related to the use and misuse of water throughout Arizona. Some of the fundamental tools for studying water will be used to examine questions ranging from ...

Other Contribution (1)

Jim Washburne: Using in Introduction to Critical Zone Science at The University of Arizona part of Critical Zone Science
I taught a small (8 person) mixed 400/500 level seminar course called Introduction to Critical Zone Science so the students were a mix of upper class undergraduates and graduates. Some of my students had prior experience (internships/RA's) with the actual Critical Zone research teams on campus so brought (and shared) their advanced but unique experiences with the class. Despite or perhaps because of their advanced level, most students had only been exposed to a narrow range of ideas relative to the big picture of Critical Zone integrated systems.