AGU-NESTA 2016
Fall GIFT Workshop
Presenter Application

Thank you for your interest in presenting at the AGU-NESTA 2016 Fall Geophysical Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshop. The workshop is scheduled for December 12-13, 2016, at the AGU Fall Meeting. The workshop typically is attended by 50-75 educators, primarily middle and high school teachers, but includes educators working in elementary schools and informal community-based education centers as well. Participating in the AGU-NESTA GIFT workshop is an excellent way to share your science and associated educational resources with teachers and help them bring these resources directly into their classrooms.

AGU is soliciting applications from teams composed of at least one scientist and at least one education specialist (e.g. outreach specialist, science teacher) to provide presentations during the workshop. A "presentation" will be composed of a talk on an Earth or space science topic appropriate for K-12 educators coupled with one or more closely related hands-on classroom activities, with a full time for presentation of 1.5 hours. To ensure that the presentation is appropriate for the K-12 classroom, applicants are required to provide information on the relevance of the presentation topic to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Applications for presentations will be taken through August 31, 2016. At least one of the individuals involved in the presentation must be a member of AGU or be sponsored by a member of AGU. Applications will be reviewed by a committee drawn from AGU scientists, K-12 teachers, the AGU EPO community, AGU Education Staff, and the NESTA Board of Directors, who will help identify the proposals that appear to be the most appropriate to teacher needs and AGU goals and objectives. Final decisions on selected presentation teams will be made by September 26, 2016.

Each team of presenters will receive one free full-week registration to the AGU Fall Meeting, to be used by a member of the presenting team. All K-12 educators already receive free registration to AGU, so typically the GIFT free registration is used by the science presenter or someone else on the team who is not a K-12 educator.

About Your Team


Position - Select All that Apply and/or Type in the Other Position Box:























Position - Select All that Apply and/or Type in the Other Position Box:






















About Your Presentation




AGU has three key science propriety areas: 1) climate change, 2) natural hazards, and 3) natural resources. Please indicate if you think your presentation is aligned with one of these areas or if it addresses a current issue/hot topic in Earth and Space science. (Check as many as you feel are appropriate to your presentation. Otherwise check "Does Not Apply".)










Grade level(s) of the activity/activities







How Your Presentation Supports the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) incorporate the three dimensions of learning from the National Research Council's Framework for K-12 Science Education. These include 1) Science and Engineering Practices, 2) Crosscutting Concepts, and 3) Disciplinary Core Ideas. Your talk and activities should address these dimensions so that students in the classrooms of teachers participating in the GIFT workshop can meet NGSS performance expectations. From the lists below, choose the one most relevant practice, and the one most relevant crosscutting concept plus no more than three disciplinary core ideas (DCI's) addressed by your presentation.
Science and Engineering Practices







Crosscutting Concepts






Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI's)When selecting a DCI, consider the grade level of your presentation.
Earth and Space ScienceESS1 Earth's Place in the Universe




ESS2 Earth's Systems






ESS3 Earth and Human Activity







Workshop Materials for Your PresentationYou are strongly encouraged to upload workshop materials for review. These materials include resources that you provide to participants, such as activity lesson plans, datasheets, PowerPoint presentations for the talk or an outline of talking points, and supporting websites or datasets, if applicable. GIFT workshop participants receive these digital resources prior to the workshop. You should own the copyright to these materials or they should be sharable under the Creative Commons license. In the past teachers have rated these resources as one of the most valuable aspects of the GIFT workshop. After the workshop, these resources will be made freely available to educators via the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) website. Making these resources available to other educators increases the reach and potential educational impact of your workshop content and activities.
If you have presented these materials to educators before, you may also wish to provide reviewers with past evaluation information. Upload all files in Word, pdf, or PowerPoint format.
All uploaded files are public unless you are in a private workspace

Title: A descriptive, human readable title.

e.g. 'Student Handout for Sauerkraut Assignment'

Select the file: Make sure it has an appropriate suffix (e.g. .doc) or specify the type in the Optional Fields below

Description: A very brief description of the file.

File Type:


The system will attempt to determine the correct file type based on the name of the file you've selected. Choosing the correct file type here will override that.

File Name:

e.g. 'student_handout'
This will be the name of the downloaded file. By default the system will generate this based on the title you specified and the type of file. If you specify a name here it will over-ride the automatically generated name. This is generally only useful when uploading file of a type not recognized by the system (not in the list of file types above). In that situation choose File Type: Unknown Binary and include the appropriate suffix in the file name here. e.g. myfile.m3z Avoid spaces or special characters in the file names.

Authorship/Reuse

Either:
I am the author (copyright holder) of the contents of this file and people are allowed to reuse it for non-commercial purposes as long as they give me attribution as described by this creative commons license.
Or
Who is the original creator/copyright holder of the information in this file?

Provenance/Acknowledgements

A short description of where the material came from. Include names and institutions of authors and contributors as well as acknowledgment of any work from which this was derived.

Reuse License

The creator/copyright holder must have agreed to allow distribution of this file through this site.
If you are the creator we strongly encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option.

If none of the above licenses apply describe the conditions under which this material appears on this site as well as any information about reuse beyond this site.

Distributing information on the web generally requires the permission of the copyright holder--usually the original creator. Providing the information we request here will help visitors to this site understand the ways in which they may (legally) use what they find.

If you created this file (and haven't signed away your copyright) then we'd encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option. You'll retain the copyright to your file and can do as you please with it in the future. Through this choice you are also explicitly allowing others to reuse that file as long as they give you attribution, and don't use it for commercial purposes.

If the file (or content within it) was created by others you'll need their permission. If it predates 1923 or was created by a U.S federal employee (as part of their job) it is likely in the public domain (and we can all do as we choose with it). The original author may also have explicitly stated how it may be reused (e.g. through a creative commons license). You can describe the licensing/reuse situation in the box above.

Without permission you should not upload the file. There are several options in this case:

  • You can contact the original author to get permission.
  • You can provide a link to (or a description of how to get) the original material rather than uploading it here.
  • You can find a substitute that isn't encumbered by copyright.
  • You can create a substitute yourself. Remember, ideas can't be copyrighted, only particular expressions of those ideas. Of course you'll want to give credit the original author.

The Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center has more good information about copyright as it applies to academic settings.

All uploaded files are public unless you are in a private workspace

Title: A descriptive, human readable title.

e.g. 'Student Handout for Sauerkraut Assignment'

Select the file: Make sure it has an appropriate suffix (e.g. .doc) or specify the type in the Optional Fields below

Description: A very brief description of the file.

File Type:


The system will attempt to determine the correct file type based on the name of the file you've selected. Choosing the correct file type here will override that.

File Name:

e.g. 'student_handout'
This will be the name of the downloaded file. By default the system will generate this based on the title you specified and the type of file. If you specify a name here it will over-ride the automatically generated name. This is generally only useful when uploading file of a type not recognized by the system (not in the list of file types above). In that situation choose File Type: Unknown Binary and include the appropriate suffix in the file name here. e.g. myfile.m3z Avoid spaces or special characters in the file names.

Authorship/Reuse

Either:
I am the author (copyright holder) of the contents of this file and people are allowed to reuse it for non-commercial purposes as long as they give me attribution as described by this creative commons license.
Or
Who is the original creator/copyright holder of the information in this file?

Provenance/Acknowledgements

A short description of where the material came from. Include names and institutions of authors and contributors as well as acknowledgment of any work from which this was derived.

Reuse License

The creator/copyright holder must have agreed to allow distribution of this file through this site.
If you are the creator we strongly encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option.

If none of the above licenses apply describe the conditions under which this material appears on this site as well as any information about reuse beyond this site.

Distributing information on the web generally requires the permission of the copyright holder--usually the original creator. Providing the information we request here will help visitors to this site understand the ways in which they may (legally) use what they find.

If you created this file (and haven't signed away your copyright) then we'd encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option. You'll retain the copyright to your file and can do as you please with it in the future. Through this choice you are also explicitly allowing others to reuse that file as long as they give you attribution, and don't use it for commercial purposes.

If the file (or content within it) was created by others you'll need their permission. If it predates 1923 or was created by a U.S federal employee (as part of their job) it is likely in the public domain (and we can all do as we choose with it). The original author may also have explicitly stated how it may be reused (e.g. through a creative commons license). You can describe the licensing/reuse situation in the box above.

Without permission you should not upload the file. There are several options in this case:

  • You can contact the original author to get permission.
  • You can provide a link to (or a description of how to get) the original material rather than uploading it here.
  • You can find a substitute that isn't encumbered by copyright.
  • You can create a substitute yourself. Remember, ideas can't be copyrighted, only particular expressions of those ideas. Of course you'll want to give credit the original author.

The Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center has more good information about copyright as it applies to academic settings.

All uploaded files are public unless you are in a private workspace

Title: A descriptive, human readable title.

e.g. 'Student Handout for Sauerkraut Assignment'

Select the file: Make sure it has an appropriate suffix (e.g. .doc) or specify the type in the Optional Fields below

Description: A very brief description of the file.

File Type:


The system will attempt to determine the correct file type based on the name of the file you've selected. Choosing the correct file type here will override that.

File Name:

e.g. 'student_handout'
This will be the name of the downloaded file. By default the system will generate this based on the title you specified and the type of file. If you specify a name here it will over-ride the automatically generated name. This is generally only useful when uploading file of a type not recognized by the system (not in the list of file types above). In that situation choose File Type: Unknown Binary and include the appropriate suffix in the file name here. e.g. myfile.m3z Avoid spaces or special characters in the file names.

Authorship/Reuse

Either:
I am the author (copyright holder) of the contents of this file and people are allowed to reuse it for non-commercial purposes as long as they give me attribution as described by this creative commons license.
Or
Who is the original creator/copyright holder of the information in this file?

Provenance/Acknowledgements

A short description of where the material came from. Include names and institutions of authors and contributors as well as acknowledgment of any work from which this was derived.

Reuse License

The creator/copyright holder must have agreed to allow distribution of this file through this site.
If you are the creator we strongly encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option.

If none of the above licenses apply describe the conditions under which this material appears on this site as well as any information about reuse beyond this site.

Distributing information on the web generally requires the permission of the copyright holder--usually the original creator. Providing the information we request here will help visitors to this site understand the ways in which they may (legally) use what they find.

If you created this file (and haven't signed away your copyright) then we'd encourage you to select the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike option. You'll retain the copyright to your file and can do as you please with it in the future. Through this choice you are also explicitly allowing others to reuse that file as long as they give you attribution, and don't use it for commercial purposes.

If the file (or content within it) was created by others you'll need their permission. If it predates 1923 or was created by a U.S federal employee (as part of their job) it is likely in the public domain (and we can all do as we choose with it). The original author may also have explicitly stated how it may be reused (e.g. through a creative commons license). You can describe the licensing/reuse situation in the box above.

Without permission you should not upload the file. There are several options in this case:

  • You can contact the original author to get permission.
  • You can provide a link to (or a description of how to get) the original material rather than uploading it here.
  • You can find a substitute that isn't encumbered by copyright.
  • You can create a substitute yourself. Remember, ideas can't be copyrighted, only particular expressions of those ideas. Of course you'll want to give credit the original author.

The Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center has more good information about copyright as it applies to academic settings.



Other GIFT OpportunitiesShare-a-Thon
Teams which are not selected to present full 1.5 hr workshops at GIFT will have an opportunity to present in one of the two GIFT Workshop Share-a-Thons. If your presentation is not selected for a full workshop presentation, would you like to have your presentation considered for participation in one of the Share-a-Thons? Share-a-Thons are similar to a poster session, except you share an activity or resource with teachers, who circulate around the room to multiple presenters during a one hour event. Share-a-Thon presenters are given some table space to set up materials for teachers (but not a poster display board), and are expected to provide a copy of resources for the teachers to take with them.


Exploration Station
Exploration Station is a program of activities that gives the public and AGU Earth and space scientists who are education/outreach professionals a chance to interact in San Francisco. This event is four hours long, free, and open to the public. Participants make their way through about 25 exhibits offering a variety of easy, family friendly, hands-on activities and an opportunity to interact one-on-one with scientists, engineers, and education specialists. Exploration Station will take place Sunday, December 11, 2016 from 1:00-5:00pm. As an exhibitor, you would be expected to be at the event for the full four hours plus set-up and take-down time. You would also be expected to create a fun, dynamic, and interactive learning experience for 1000 members of the public of all ages. All costs for the event other than shipping and handling of materials are covered by AGU.


Additional Information (Optional)