MARGINS Data in the Classroom > Mini-Lessons > Mini-Lesson Collection > A Volcanic Record Through Time

A Volcanic Record Through Time

This page authored by Susanne Straub, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory.
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This activity was selected for the On the Cutting Edge Reviewed Teaching Collection

This activity has received positive reviews in a peer review process involving five review categories. The five categories included in the process are

  • Scientific Accuracy
  • Alignment of Learning Goals, Activities, and Assessments
  • Pedagogic Effectiveness
  • Robustness (usability and dependability of all components)
  • Completeness of the ActivitySheet web page

For more information about the peer review process itself, please see http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/review.html.


This page first made public: Apr 22, 2009

Summary

This is a lecture that can be used - or adapted for use - in undergraduate geoscience classes. The goal of the lecture is to familiarize students with the concept of volcanic change through time at tectonic time scale commensurate to plate tectonic change. The lecture should follow lectures on rocks, minerals, Earth's layers and simple plate tectonics and Earth's Cenozoic evolution. A discussion can be incorporated on what information can be gained and on what Earth question can be addressed by studying long-term volcanic evolution. The lesson uses an example from Margins Subduction Factory Initiatives in order to illustrate possibilities, problems, limitations and outcome of obtaining a rock record through the life on a volcanic arc.

Learning Goals

Concepts to be understood: (1) Earth is a dynamic planet that underwent significant plate tectonics change throughout the Cenozoic; (2) Plate tectonic change is linked to volcanism, driven by processes in the Earth interior, and that may contribute the Cenozoic evolution of outer Earth; (3) How to obtain volcanic rock records on time scale relevant to plate tectonic change; (4) possibilities, problems and limitations of obtaining a rock record through the life on a volcanic arc.

Context for Use

This lecture segment may stand alone, but may also be adapted for use in other undergraduate geoscience classes. The lecture should follow lectures on rocks, minerals, Earth's layers and simple plate tectonics and Cenozoic evolution. Segments of the lecture may also be used in lessons introducing volcanic arcs, or illustrate an example of what data/information can be obtain by scientific drilling. The lecture may also be used as review for an upper level class, or to launch a more quantitative lessons on subduction cycling and plate tectonic processes.

Description and Teaching Materials

Teaching materials are online resources that are embedded in the powerpoint file (PowerPoint 25.9MB May18 09).

Teaching Notes and Tips

The powerpoint files contains notes that guide through teaching.

Assessment

The last part of the lecture (discussion of the time-dependent geochemical outflux of the Izu Bonin arc) can also be assigned as homework.

References and Resources

These are embedded in the powerpoint.

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