Integrate > Teaching for Sustainability > Modules and Courses

InTeGrate Authored Modules and Courses

Explore the Modules and Courses


General Education Teacher Preparation Beyond Geoscience Materials in Development

General Education Course Material

Introductory Geoscience Modules

Modules based on the literacy documents that are suitable for use in large face-to-face, blended, and distance introductory courses. Read more...

Glacier image bar
Hide Caption
Glacier image bar[creative commons]
Provenance: Image created by Chris Goldberg from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisgold/
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Climate of Change: Interactions and Feedbacks Between Water, Air and Ice

Cynthia Fadem (Earlham College), Cindy Shellito (University of Northern Colorado), Becca Walker (Mt San Antonio College)

In this two to three week module, students explore short-term climate variability resulting from atmosphere-ocean-ice interactions. The module promotes awareness of past and contemporary cultures and regions strongly affected by permanently altered or increasingly uncertain climates as students consider human adaptation to climate fluctuations. Students investigate the dynamics and impacts associated with climate variability by examining and analyzing atmosphere, ocean, and ice data; completing a series of readings; and engaging in group discussions. Materials and teaching descriptions for gallery walks, interactive discussions, group work, and lab exercises are provided.

ag_banner4
Hide Caption
ag_banner4[creative commons]
Provenance: Manu; https://www.flickr.com/photos/seven_of9/
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

A Growing Concern: Sustaining Soil Resources through Local Decision Making

Sarah Fortner (Wittenberg University), Martha Murphy (Santa Rosa Junior College), Hannah Scherer (Virginia Tech)

Continued agricultural productivity and the ability to feed the earth's growing population hinges on understanding how to manage soil resources. This module will address this need by providing students the opportunity to examine the differences between intensively managed agricultural landscapes (e.g. grazelands, conventional tillage) and "natural" landscapes (forested or prairie) landscapes. Using learning-centered strategies, students will develop a working knowledge of soil physical properties and geospatial data at both local and global scales. The module culminates with a project centered on making sustainable soil management decisions under global climate change.

Homestake Gold Mine
Hide Caption
Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, SD[creative commons]
Provenance: Photo by Travis S. and accessed via Flickr.com: https://www.flickr.com/photos/baggis/5156621907/in/photostream/
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Humans' Dependence on Earth's Mineral Resources

Prajukti (juk) Bhattacharyya (University of Wisconsin, Whitewater), Joy Branlund (Southwestern Illinois College), Leah Joseph (Ursinus College)

This 2-3 week module engages students in exploring where products they use come from and what it took to produce them. Students learn about rocks and minerals, methods of discovery and extraction, and the impact of mineral resource use. Geoscience concepts are taught in the context of societal issues while also asking students to confront concerns such as environmental justice, economics, personal choice, and politics that may arise due to obtaining, transporting, trading, using, and disposing of natural resources.

vesuvius
Hide Caption
vesuvius[creative commons]
Provenance: Oliver-Bonjoch (wikimedia)
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Living on the Edge: Building resilient societies on active plate margins

Laurel Goodell (Princeton), Peter Selkin (University of Washington-Tacoma), Rachel Teasdale (California State University, Chico)

This module, intended to take two weeks in an introductory-level class, is divided into three units that focus on geologic hazards and associated risks at representative plate boundary settings: transform, divergent and convergent. Students are assumed to be familiar with the basics of plate tectonics, including the general characteristics of plate boundaries, but an introductory unit is provided for students to obtain the needed background.

Although designed to be used in the sequence transform->divergent->transform, each plate boundary unit is adaptable for use on its own. Each plate boundary unit is designed to be equivalent to two one-hour class sessions and includes: a) accounts of historically important earthquakes and/or volcanic eruptions that have occurred in that setting, b) exploration and interpretation of scientific data related the geologic processes responsible for the geologic hazard(s), c) analysis of the effects on and risks to human populations, and d) development of strategies to mitigate risks. At the end of each unit, student learning is assessed by their application of unit content to a new location in a similar plate boundary setting.


Photo of Hurricane Isabel from ISS
Hide Caption
Photo of Hurricane Isabel from ISS [reuse info]
Provenance: Image courtesy of Mike Trenchard, Earth Sciences & Image Analysis Laboratory , Johnson Space Center from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Isabel#mediaviewer/File:Hurricane_Isabel_from_ISS.jpg
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.

Natural Hazards and Risks: Hurricanes

Josh Galster (Montclair State University), Lisa Gilbert (Williams College), Joan Ramage (Lehigh University)

Making the difficult decision to evacuate before a hurricane makes landfall can save lives and property. This two week module explores how hurricanes connect the ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial systems and society. Students evaluate how hurricane hazards and risks have changed with coastal development. Students use data to track historic hurricanes and compare the impacts from different hurricanes. The module culminates in a role-playing activity in which students identify and represent stakeholders facing hypothetical evacuation in their town.




Teacher Preparation Course Material

Modules aimed at courses for pre-service teachers including both content courses (usually taught in science departments) and methods courses. Read more...

students looking at weather data
Hide Caption
students looking at weather data[creative commons]
Provenance: Photo Credit: Patrick Mansell (https://www.flickr.com/photos/pennstatelive/5734037619/)
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Exploring Geoscience Methods

Jim Ebert (SUNY Oneonta), Scott Linneman (Western Washington University), Jeff Thomas (Central Connecticut State University)

This 1-4 week module provides pre-service secondary science teachers the opportunity to use and reflect on geoscientific thinking. Students compare geoscience methods with the stereotypical experimental scientific method, use methods of geoscience to explore human impacts of global climate change, and develop interdisciplinary lessons that embed geoscientific thinking and content in a variety of disciplines.

Flooded street sign in Moorhead, MN
Hide Caption
Traffic sign surrounded by floodwater from Red River of the North at Moorhead, MN. Photo taken at 2nd Ave and 3rd St, Moorhead, MN. [reuse info]
Provenance: Don Becker, USGS http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/03_24_2010_l52Sjw7IId_03_24_2010_0#.U-Uj4yQQwcs
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.

Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity

Sue DeBari (Western Washington University), Julie Monet (CSU, Chico), Kyle Gray (University of Northern Iowa)
This 2 week module focuses on water and its importance to humans, both as a limited resource and in shaping Earth's surface. Student activities include using simplified physical models of complicated systems, utilizing Google Earth data and images, and working with real hydrological data sets. While aimed at content courses for pre-service teachers, the module can be adapted to other undergraduate introductory geoscience or environmental science courses.




Materials that Extend Teaching About the Earth beyond Geoscience Programs

Modules and courses focused on teaching about the Earth beyond geoscience courses, including teaching about Earth and sustainability with a humanities or social science lens and materials that bridge engineering, sustainability and the geosciences. Read more...

View of flooded New Orleans, Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
Hide Caption
View of flooded New Orleans, Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina[reuse info]
Provenance: Commander Mark Moran, of the NOAA Aviation Weather Center, and Lt. Phil Eastman and Lt. Dave Demers, of the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center, all commissioned officers of the NOAA Corps, flew more than 100 hours surveying Katrina’s devastation. Eastman piloted NOAA’s Bell 212 Twin Huey Helicopter from August 31 to September 19. All three men took dozens of aerial photos from an altitude of several feet to 500 feet. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Katrina-new-orleans-flooding3-2005.jpg
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.

Map Your Hazards! – Assessing Hazards, Vulnerability and Risk

Brittany Brand (Boise State University), Pamela McMullin-Messier (Central Washington University), Melissa Schlegel (College of Western Idaho)

This 3 week interdisciplinary module provides students an interactive mechanism to engage in place-based exploration of natural hazards, social vulnerability, risk and the factors that shape their community's perception of natural hazards and risk. Students integrate interdisciplinary geoscience and social science methodologies to understand societal impacts that result from natural hazards.



Materials in Development

Read more about the InTeGrate materials development process and materials currently in development.

  • Carbon, Climate, and Energy Resources module
  • Changing Biosphere module
  • Cli-Fi module
  • Coastal Processes Hazards and Society course
  • Earth Modeling course
  • Earth Systems Thinking module
  • An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources module
  • Energy, Environment, and Our Future course
  • Engaging Students in Grand Challenges in an Interdisciplinary Water Sustainability course
  • Environmental Justice and Freshwater Resources module
  • Environmental Justice and Freshwater Resources module (for use in Spanish courses)
  • Food Security module

  • Future of Food course
  • Gateway to Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability (GREENS) course
  • Global Energy and the Atmosphere module
  • Introduction to Critical Zone science course
  • Lead in the Environment module
  • Major Storms and Community Resilience module
  • Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception module
  • Oceans Sustainability module
  • Regulating Carbon Emissions to Mitigate Climate Change module
  • Soils and Society module
  • Water Science and Society course
  • Water Sustainability in Cities module

Learn more about these materials ».


« Previous Page      Next Page »