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Integrating Sustainability Concepts into First Quarter General Chemistry part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Gerry Prody, Western Washington University
The goal of this project is to insert sustainability concepts and issues into the general chemistry curriculum. Specifically, I focus on carbon as the example to be considered throughout the quarter.

Building Sustainable Communities, But What Kind? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Hannah Love, Pacific Lutheran University
This assignment, depending on the level and depth of implementation, seeks to challenge students by asking them to look beyond "greenwashed" advertisements and buzzwords to grapple with what sustainability means, whether it can be achieved, and what kinds of questions communities must confront in a search for sustainability.

Your Environmental Impact part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Eric Baer and Mayra Hernandez, Highline Community College
The following homework assignments are designed to build understanding of personal water use, sewage, waste generation and disposal, pollution sources and impacts, and energy use and costs.

Swimming Upstream: Relating Trapped Energy in Organic Hydrogenations to Use of Reduced Hydrocarbons as Energy Sources part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Shane E. Hendrickson, Wenatchee Valley College
An activity designed to inform the student of the potential and pitfalls of storing energy by the generation of reduced organic molecules, particularly as pertains to the generation of ethanol from molecules of a greater oxidation state and the ultimate fate of oxidized carbon when the energy potential is realized. As a part of a discussion of sustainability issues, the activity will be part of a discussion of global energy generation and use and couched in a form similar to the US energy flow trends.

What is the True Cost of Burning Coal? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Justin C. Lytle, Pacific Lutheran University
This activity is a framework for general chemistry students to explore the costs, ethics and alternatives to coal-fired electricity.

Renewable - But Is It Sustainable? part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Carol Burton, Bellevue Community College
Production of biofuels as an alternative energy source is not as simple as the media portray. This exercise enables students to practice critical thinking skills in evaluating the "value" of biofuels - a somewhat ambiguous concept.

Energy Resources: Considering the Sustainability of Past, Present, and Future Resource Consumption part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Molly Lawrence and Max Bronsema, Western Washington University
Students consider the vast amount of past and present energy resources in the world, their distribution, as well as the sustainability of their use. It introduces the idea of resource consumption and distribution to high school students.

Sustainability, Nuclear Waste, and the Hanford Site part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
John VanLeer, Cascadia Community College
An introduction to the Hanford Site in Washington, including its history, geology, and hydrology, and examines the sustainability issues associated with it.

Sustainability and Changing Rates of Change part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Christopher Coughenour, The Evergreen State College
To understand sustainability, students must understand rates of change. This activity includes a primer on basic rates concepts and an exercise that motivates critical thinking about rates of change and sustainability with an analysis of historical petroleum production rates data from the United States and the world.

How Clean is Nuclear Energy? An Evaluation of the Environmental Impacts of Nuclear Power as an Alternative Energy Source part of Curriculum for the Bioregion:Activities
Joyce Dinglasan-Panlilio, University of Washington Tacoma
This writing assignment is in lieu of a laboratory activity during the discussion of nuclear chemistry within the general chemistry curriculum.

Choosing Between Home Appliances: Benefits to the Planet and Your Wallet part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Corri Taylor, Wellesley College
Students research various options for new appliances and make purchasing decisions based not merely on purchase price, but also on energy efficiency, which has implications for the planet AND for longer-term personal finances. Students calculate the "payback period" for the more energy efficient appliance and calculate long-term savings.

Economics of installing Solar PV panels: is it worth it to the individual? part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Martin Walter
We show that it is economical for an individual to install solar photovoltaic panels in Denver, Colorado; and this is a sustainable strategy for society at large.

Replacing Household Appliances: Refrigerator part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Krys Stave, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV)
In this problem, students compare the energy use of their existing refrigerator with a new refrigerator.

Energy Cost of Engine Idling part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Ben Fusaro
This is an open-ended but elementary modeling exercise about idling energy behaviors and impacts.

How much energy do you save by doubling insulation? part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Joseph Skufca
Students will be provided the governing equation for steady state heat transfer across a surface. They will use that equation to explore the effect of changing the insulation value on the amount of energy used.

Solar panel statistical tests part of SISL:2012 Sustainability in Math Workshop:Activities
Owen Byer
In this activity, students will determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the number of watts of power produced on individual solar panels at Bryn Mawr College.

Modeling the carbon cycle of the anthropocene part of Quantitative Skills:Activity Collection
Heather Stoll
Students use an Excel sheet to complete forward and inverse models of changes in carbon distribution between atmosphere, ocean and the biosphere from 1751 to the present and several centuries into the future. The model is given as a mostly complete package, into which students input emissions data in various sensitivity tests.

An integrated view of the Glendale Landscape part of Cutting Edge:Hydrogeology:Hydrogeology, Soils, Geochemistry 2013:Activities
Kaye Savage, Wofford College
Students work in groups to develop posters that communicate their concept of landscape following several field labs (soils, sediment analysis, river discharge, vegetation survey, aquatic life) at one location. They ...

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Powering the Future part of Cutting Edge:Energy:Energy Activities
Pam Dugdale
This paper introduces a card exercise which allows students to make decisions about how best to provide electrical power to their country. Students must make choices between renewable and non-renewable electricity ...



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