Geology 310 Earth & Space Systems

 

Board of Teaching Licensure Standards met by Geology 310

 

Science Core: Competencies for 5-8:

 

D. A teacher of science must be able to understand and apply fundamental principles, laws, and concepts of earth and space science, life science, and physical science.  The teacher of science must:

 

  1. know and apply the fundamental principles, laws and concepts of earth and space science including understanding –

a.     the components and evolution of the Earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

i.      describe, using words, diagrams, pictures, and graphs, the physical properties of a given Earth material                      (IV, V, VIII, X)

b.     matter and energy in the Earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

i.    explain, using convection, conduction, and radiation, how matter is transported and how energy drives the process of transportation of matter within and between given Earth subsystems or structures

(IV, V, VI, XII, XIII, XIV)

c.     the Earth in the solar system and the universe as evidenced by the ability to:

ii. explain qualitatively, using fundamental processes of chemical, physical, and geological change, how processes of change on a given solar system object are different or similar to Earth            (II, IV, V, VI, XV)

iii. describe, using words, diagrams, and physical models, the motion of objects in our solar system                              (XII)

d.     human interactions with the earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

i.      describe using words, diagrams, pictures, graphs, historic records, and physical models, the scientific basis for predicting the occurrence of a given environmental hazard on a human time frame (VII, IX, XIII)

ii.     describe, using words, diagrams, pictures, maps, and physical or computer models, the observed changes in a given Earth system that are due directly or indirectly to human activity      (VI, VII, XII, XIII, XIV, XV)

iii.   predict, using words, diagrams, pictures, maps, and physical or computer models, the probable movement of pollutants in a given Earth system                                                                         (XIII)

3.     know and apply the fundamental principles, laws, and concepts of the physical sciences including understanding:

g. thermodynamics as evidenced by the ability to:

iv.    explain qualitiatively, using First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics energy, changes in a given spontaneous or nonspontaneous reaction (III)

h. chemical kinetics and equilibrium as evidenced by the ability to:     (II, III, XIV)

i.               explain, using the requirements for effective particle collisions and activation energy, why a given spontaneous reaction is fast or slow, and predict the conditions necessary to make the reaction occur more rapidly

ii.              explain, using the concept of activation energy and the requirements for effective particle collisions, how a given catalyst increases the rate of a given reaction

iii.            explain, using the kinetic-molecular model, how a given change in temperature, concentration, or particle surface area changes the rate of a given chemical reaction

iv.             describe, using words, diagrams, chemical equations, and concentration graphs, the equilibrium of a given reaction

v.              explain, in terms of changes in the number of effective collisions of the molecules in the forwards and reverse reaction, why the chemical equilibrium of a given reaction is a dynamic process

vi.             explain and predict change in the equilibrium of a given chemical reaction when the temperature changes, the pressure changes, a catalyst is added, or the concentration or products changes

 

Earth & Space Science: Competencies for (9-12)

 

A.  A teacher of earth and space science must demonstrate a conceptual understanding of earth science.  The teacher must:

1.     Use information to solve unfamiliar qualitative and quantitative problems and communicate the solution in a logical and organized manner as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     Describe, in terms of the known and unknown quantities, a given problem in appropriate pictorial, graphical, or written forms; (I, II, IV – XV)

b.     Translate a given topographical or geological map into a cross-sectional view;                                                                            (IV – VIII)

c.      Describe qualitatively in appropriate terms, using words, stratigraphic columns, flow charts, maps, cross-sectional views, graphs, and drawings as necessary, a given problem solution;               (IV - X)

d.      Plan, using words, diagrams, pictures, and simple mathematical relationships, a solution for a given problem in terms of steps necessary to solve the problem and to verify the solution;               (I – XVI)

e.      Evaluate, in terms of unit consistency, reasonableness, and completeness of solution, the solution of a given problem;                    (VI, IX)

2.   Use computers to display and analyze experimental and theoretical data as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     Describe data graphically using a computer;               (II)

b.     Design a mathematical model to provide reasonable fit to a given set of data;                                                                         (II)

c.      Develop a plan to ensure a safe environment and practices in all earth and space science learning activities.                                  (X)

 

 

B.    A teacher must demonstrate knowledge of earth and space science concepts. The teacher must:

1.     understand the components that make up the earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     perform measurements and statistical analyses to describe the physical properties of a given earth material;                              (Geology 121 Only)

b.     explain for a given earth material, in terms of chemical bond strength and chemical composition, how physical properties are related to basic chemical structure;                                                           (IV, V, VII, VIII, X)

c.     describe, using words, pictures, diagrams, maps or globes, and satellite images, the component materials, large scale structures, and dominant physical processes of  a given earth subsystem;           (II, IV-X)

d.     explain, using seismic evidence, laboratory simulations of earth-interior conditions, terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, and models of chemical differentiation, how we know the interior of the earth is segregated chemically and physically into layers;                                (II)

2.     understand energy in the earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     describe, using words, pictures, diagrams, and physical or computer models, the radiant, chemical, nuclear, and gravitational energies of a given earth subsystem or structure;                                     (II-IV, IX, XII-XIV)

b.     describe, using words, pictures, diagrams, and physical or computer models, the flow of energy within and between given earth subsystems or structures;                                                    (II-IV, VI, XIII-XV)

c.     describe, using words, pictures, diagrams, mathematical and chemical equations, physical or computer models, and electronic data sets, the transportation of matter within and between given earth subsystems and structures;                                                                     (II -VIII, XIV, XV)

d.     explain and predict, in terms of conservation of energy, dynamic equilibrium, and geologic or atmospheric models, changes in behavior of an earth subsystem or structure due to a given change in energy;

(II, VI, XII-XV)

3.     understand geochemical cycling as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     explain, in terms of reaction equilibrium and disequilibrium and mass balance, how chemical elements and compounds in a given simple earth system are distributed;                                                         (II-VI)

b.    explain and predict quantitatively and qualitatively, using related experimental data and the principles of mass balance and chemical equilibrium, how concentration of an element or compound will change in a given reservoir interacting with another given reservoir; (II,IX, XIII, XIV)

c.     describe, using words, pictures, and diagrams, the concentration and depletion of given elements or compounds in a given reservoir;

                                                                                             (IV-VIII, XII)

d.     explain, using mass balance, advection, convection, and chemical equilibrium, the process by which a given depletion or concentration of elements or compounds could have occurred in a given reservoir;

                                                                                          (IV-VIII, XII)

5.     understand the Earth in the solar system as evidenced by the ability to:

a.     describe, with words, chemical formulas, drawings, scaled diagrams, and numerical orders of magnitude, the mass, size and composition for a given solar system object                                                         (II, XII, XIV)

b.     explain and predict, using geologic and climatic stability, availability of nutrients, and atmospheric parameters, the suitability for life for a given planetary description                                                      (II, III, XV)

c.     explain and predict quantitatively, using Newton’s laws of motions and gravitation and conservation of momentum, the motion of the bodies of a given solar system                                                       (XII)

d.     explain, with words, diagrams, and models using orbital paths and relative sizes of solar system objects, the locationally dependent observation of solar and lunar eclipses and phases of the moon for a given simple solar system                                                                                              (XII)

 

Note: Lessons addressing each competency are indicated using roman numerals in bold above, which correlate with those appearing on the course schedule. Many of the competencies are also touched upon outside of this narrow listing.