Tool and Data

Tool

ImageJ

http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/

ImageJ can display, edit, analyze, process, save and print 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit images. It can read many image formats including TIFF, GIF, JPEG, BMP, DICOM, FITS and "raw." It supports "stacks," a series of images that share a single window, and animation. It can calculate area and pixel value statistics of user-defined selections. It can measure distances and angles. Images can be zoomed up to 32:1 and down to 1:32. All analysis and processing functions are available at any magnification factor. Spatial calibration can be set to provide real world dimensional measurements.

Tool Builder

Wayne Rasband, National Institutes of Health

Tool Cost

FreeImageJ is in the public domain.

Tool Help

http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/docs/concepts.html

Data Source 1

MODIS Imagery

Two MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are orbiting Earth; one on the Terra satellite and another on the Aqua satellite. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. The MODIS instruments "see" the Earth at in 36 different wavelengths of the spectrum, ranging from visible to thermal infrared light.

Geospatial Coverage

MODIS data are available for the entire globe.

Scenes used in this EET chapter have the following bounding box: N: 47.594 degrees S: 39.602 degrees E: 63.316 degrees W: 55.688 degrees

Temporal Coverage

MODIS data are available from February 24, 2000 through present. The same scene is imaged every two days.

Data Provider

The MODIS Land Rapid Response system provides rapid access to MODIS data globally, with initial emphasis on 250m color composite imagery and active fire data. This research and development system is a contribution to the rapid prototyping of NASA's Applications data and information systems, providing data and information in support of decision making. The MODIS Land Rapid Response imagery augment the MODIS Standard Land Products, which can be obtained from linked here.

Data Help

http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/about/

Data Source 2

Landsat Imagery

Landsat satellites "view" Earth at seven different wavelengths. Color images are created from the satellite data by assigning red, green, or blue light to the views of three different wavelengths, then combining them into one image. The resulting image is called a false-color image because it uses red, green, and blue to show features as they appear at some other wavelength.

The USGS Eros Data Center provided the images, based on data provided by the Landsat science team. Landsat data were scaled and registered so that the images show the exact same area at exactly the same scale. This pre-processing step involved adjusting the size of the images and cropping them.

Geospatial Coverage

Landsat imagery covers the entire Earth.

Temporal Coverage

A series of Landsat satellites have been recording scenes from 1972 through today. The same scene on Earth can be imaged every 16 days by Landsat 7.

Data Provider

For general information on using Landsat images and remotely sensed data, see GSFC's Remote Sensing Tutorial

Data Help

For general information on using Landsat images and remotely sensed data, see GSFC's Remote Sensing Tutorial


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