Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics > Teaching Methods > Cooperative Learning > Economic Examples

Economic Examples

The following examples were designed explicitly for economics courses. However, one should not narrow their focus on this limited set of examples since much can be learned about how to develop and incorporate cooperative learning examples by reviewing exercises developed for other disciplines. A number of non economics cooperative learning exercises can be found in this module.

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A Send-a-Problem Exercise for Applying Labor Force Participation Models to Popular Press Articles part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Send-a-problem exercise used to link economic theory covered in a labor economics course with related trends exemplified in a popular press article.

Economies of scale part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Working in groups of three, students analyze economies of scale. Each student constructs an individual short-run ATC curve, then the three students collaborate to determine if there are economies or diseconomies of scale and to create the long run ATC.

Think-Pair-Share: Analyzing changes in supply & demand and predicting impacts on equilibrium part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
An exercise designed to facilitate understanding of supply and demand shifts as well as impacts on market outcomes with follow up exercises covering these and related concepts.

An Extended Think-Pair-Share Application: Trends in the U.S. Wage Structure part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This activity uses a think-pair-share approach to helping students connect observations about disparate changes in the market for skilled/unskilled labor to long-run trends in wage inequality.