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Which U.S. President generated the highest budget deficits? part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Examples
Students compare budget deficits and surpluses generated between 1969 and 2008 measured in nominal terms and then as a percentage of GDP.

What is the opportunity cost of attending class? part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Examples
Students calculate the opportunity cost of attending one class. The exercise reinforces learning about implicit, explicit and total opportunity costs.

Understanding money: Where is most of my money? part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Examples
This activity uses an Interactive Lecture Demonstration to help students understand the definition of money in a modern economy. Starting with the common misconception that money is coins and currency, the ...

Shape of the demand curve part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Examples
A classroom auction reveals reservation prices and a demand curve for an introductory economics course.

The Economics of Drug Legalization: A Double Entry Journal part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lectures:Examples
The activity is designed to be an interative lecture segment during a larger interactive lecture class period. The technique demonstrated through this example is a double entry journal.

Externalities in the cashmere market: Colbert Report interview part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lectures:Examples
In this interactive lecture, students watch a video clip from The Colbert Report that addresses pollution externalities. Students graph the market and use the write-pair-share technique, then brainstorm ways to move the market to the socially efficient equilibrium.

Interactive lecture on diminishing marginal product: tennis ball production part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lectures:Examples
In this interactive lecture, students "produce" tennis balls with fixed capital and increasing labor, generating a production function. Students calculate the marginal product of each work and discover that marginal product falls as the number of workers rises.

Where Do I Begin? Using Think-Pair-Share to Initiate the Problem Solving Process part of Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This exercise uses the Think-Pair-Share technique to initiate the problem-solving process. It focuses on a common first step in economic problem solving: identifying relevant and irrelevant information.

Exploring and Explaining Determinants of Supply and Demand: Utilizing the Think-Pair-Share Technique part of Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This is a two-part activity that implements an extension of the "think-pair-share" cooperative learning technique to study the determinants of supply and demand through hypothetical and real world examples.

Cooperative Learning Exercises to Teach the Gains from Trade part of Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
This is a cooperative learning exerise that allows students to learn about comparative advantage and the gains from trade.