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Writing about Numbers We Should Know part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This opening assignment for an introductory quantitative reasoning course asks students to write about "Numbers We Should Know." Its goal is to help students begin to think quantitatively, evaluate the sources of quantitative information critically, and write using numbers precisely and thoughtfully.

Economic argument about increasing fuel efficiency part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
Critique of an economic argument about increasing fuel efficiency involving linear and exponential growth.

Data Rich Economic Policy Brief part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This assignment asks students to write a data-rich policy brief, showing their ability to apply standard microeconomic models and contextualizing the policy debate with numeric evidence.

Calculating Divorce Rates part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This exercise from a course in family sociology asseses students' ability to interpret divorce rates from provided spreadsheet data and to critically analyze three articles that use divorce rates in their content.

Economic Development of British Colonial America part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
Through a close study of a rich set of demographic and economic statistics, students will see the development over 150 years of two similar yet divergent colonies (Virginia and Barbados). They will work through population, land use, and trade statistics with closely-guiding questions in order to find links between one set of numbers and another.

Using State-Level Data to Study Nominal and Real GDP, Part 1GDP Deflators and Inflation Rates part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
Calculation of state-level GDP deflators and inflation rates "Using FRED" section.

Exploring Economic Inequality with Data part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
This set of assignments exposes students to data which can be used to analyze economic inequality in international and historical context. Then students are asked to generate a thesis-driven argument drawing supporting evidence from one or more of the data sources.

The US economy during your lifetime part of Teaching Methods:Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Examples
Students predict the best graphical representation of US real GDP/capita during the last twenty years, choosing from graphs showing: cyclical decline, cyclical change with no net change, cyclical increase, or erratic wide fluctuations. Using actual US data, students graph real GDP/capita to find out the actual pattern: a rising series with periodic dips, not a flat series, a falling series, or a highly erratic series as students often predict. Students then reflect on why this pattern is often misunderstood and why it may not fully describe the well-being of the US population.

Principles of Economics: understanding opportunity cost, comparative advantage, and absolute advantage part of Teaching Methods:Just in Time Teaching:Examples
In principles of economics students many times have trouble understanding the concept of opportunity cost, connecting opportunity cost to comparative advantage, and differentiating between absolute advantage and comparative advantage. This activity allows the instructor to detect whether a large number of students exhibit any of these misconceptions, and then focus on the most problematic concepts in class.

JiTT - Fighting Recession: 2009 part of Teaching Methods:Just in Time Teaching:Examples
This is a JiTT exercise in which students apply introductory-level macroeconomic analysis to the question of how large the stimulus package put forward to Congress in early 2009 needed to be to close the ...