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DMVs go to South Africa

Joberg DMV workshop 2
Teachers model interactive teaching using whiteboards during the Johannesburg Physics Teachers Workshop. Image credit: Colleen Henning, St John's College[creative commons]
Provenance: Peter Bohacek
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In August 2015, Direct Measurement Video Project co-leader Peter Bohacek traveled to South Africa to share Direct Measurement Video at two physics teaching conferences in Johannesburg and Cape Town. More than 130 educators from across South Africa and from neighboring Malawi attended the events organized by Dr. Colleen Henning of St. John's College in Johannesburg and Dr. Mark Horner of Siyavula in Cape Town.

During the Direct Measurement workshops at the conferences, teachers worked through several methods of using Direct Measurement Videos as interactive activities using whiteboards and modeling student discourse. Rather than discussing and describing these teaching methods, teachers engaged in the process themselves. Teachers worked in collaborative groups, recording their work on whiteboards, engaging in whole-class discourse while explaining their reasoning and methods.

Feedback from participants was encouraging, and teachers have begun using Direct Measurement Videos in their science classrooms. The DMV team is very grateful to Dr. Colleen Henning and St. John's College, as well and Dr. Mark Horner and his team at Siyavula, for creating this opportunity to share Direct Measurement Video with teachers.

Wow! We had such a great lesson yesterday working with the Rollercoaster first, then the Ice skaters! The girls loved the change in routine, and everything went according to plan. It generated some robust discussion as to what we were actually measuring in the Rollercoaster DMV, average or instantaneous velocity. My two colleagues observed my lesson, and we're so inspired that they tried it with their classes as well, and had great experiences. We will definitely be trying others out in the not-too-distant future. – Tracy Kirsten St. Mary's Diocesan School for Girls, Kloof, South Africa


DMV Leader Peter Bohacek wins Presidential Teaching Award.

Presidential Award in Math and Science Teaching icon
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The Direct Measurement Video project is honored to announce that Peter Bohacek was awarded the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. This is the highest recognition that a kindergarten through 12th grade mathematics or science teacher may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. The DMV project was an essential part of his award nomination and was featured in his award profile. Read more in this MPR News Story.

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Provenance: Peter Bohacek
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Explorations with DMV Interactive Spaces

Another feature of our new Gen2 DMV Player is that students can vary parameters in the scenario they're exploring. For example, our new wave properties videos allow students to independently vary three parameters: wave amplitude, frequency, and spring tension. Using floating measurement tools and stopwatch, students can explore which properties of mechanical waves affect each other. Does the frequency of a wave affect the wave velocity? What about the amplitude?

Here are some examples of videos that allow students to explore the relationships between physical quantities:


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Provenance: Peter Bohacek
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Gen2 DMV Player Now in Limited Release

Users may have noticed that we've been slowly introducing a new version of DMV Player for some videos. New features include floating tools that can be selected and positioned by the user, and a new stopwatch. The stopwatch displays time in seconds and frames so students don't have to convert frames to seconds, and allows students to set the stopwatch to zero. Over the next few months, we'll be refining these features, adding more functionality, and redesigning our user-interface. We hope that these new features will make it even easier for students to explore, analyze, and apply physics reasoning to Direct Measurement Videos.

Here are some examples of videos that use Gen2 DMV Player:


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Provenance: Peter Bohacek
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Direct Measurement Videos mentioned in Science magazine

OK, so we have not made to cover yet, but being mentioned in Science magazine is at least worth a sentence on our site. Science correspondent Eli Kintisch wrote about the many uses of video in science and included the Direct Measurement Video Project in his list.


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Provenance: Peter Bohacek
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Using Direct Measurement Videos to teach rotation in AP Physics 1: Martha Lietz

"I'd like to share a tool with you I've just fallen in love with: Direct Measurement Video," writes Martha Lietz, AP Physics teacher, blogger, and member of the AP Physics Development Committee, in an article posted on her blog. Martha describes how she uses Direct Measurement Videos to teach rotation in her AP Physics 1 class. This is a challenging topic for first year students, and Martha provides detailed descriptions and student instructions about how she uses Direct Measurement Videos. Martha says, "Using these videos as an alternative to the traditional book problems encourages deep conceptual understanding as it requires the students to decide what to measure to answer the question, rather than just using the numbers they are given."


New Activity: Physics Face-off

The Physics Face-off is an activity where students use Direct Measurement Videos to learn science practices described in the Next Generation Science Standards and Advanced Placement Physics 1 and 2 curriculum. Students are assigned a Direct Measurement Video and are asked to develop a question that can be answered using the information they can glean from the video. Students try to develop a particularly difficult and interesting question that they can solve, and challenge other students to be able to solve it as well.


Direct Measurement Videos in new MIT and Boston University online physics courses

Direct Measurement Videos are featured in two new physics MOOCs (massive open online course). Both courses are offered on edX.BUx: PY1x Preparing for the AP* Physics 1 Exam was created by Andrew Duffy and his team at Boston University, while MITx: 8.MechCx Advanced Introductory Classical Mechanics was created by David Pritchard and his RELATE group.

Both courses feature new and innovative ways to integrate Direct Measurement Video into online instruction, including integrated graphing and curve-fitting tools. At the time of this writing, over 15,000 students are enrolled in these courses.


Popular Videos

We like to see which videos teachers and students are using in classroom. During the school week, we typically see about 1000 page views per day on this site, mostly views of videos in the DMV player. In November and December, the top three videos were, Conservation of energy in a pendulum, Einstein rides the graviton, and the Cart push-off series.


Project Development Notes (Dec 2014): Next-Generation DMVs

Lately we've been working on two new generations of Direct-Measurement Videos: videos where students select, calibrate, and position measurement tools, and video suites, or labs, where students can select parameters of the video they want to change. Both of these are still in prototype form, but we are happy to have instructors view and begin to use them with their students.

Here are two recent examples of prototype DMVs:

Fan Cart Lab shows how force causes acceleration. Viewers can select from four fan forces to explore the relationship between force and acceleration.

Falling Wheels shows an example of a classic rotational dynamics problem, allowing students to compare the motion of different shapes of wheels as the fall from a string suspended from the ceiling.


Press

A November 2014 post from the Jacobs Physics blog shares surprising results while teaching with a Direct Measurement Video assignment. "But then something beautiful happened... virtually all my students, even the ones who had been struggling, wrote me crystal clear explanations to follow up on their mathematics."
See the Einstein riding the Graviton video.

Direct Measurement Videos were featured in the public radio program Marketplace in August 2104. The story, called Who Created that App? describes digital innovations created by teachers to improve student engagement. Peter Bohacek is interviewed in the piece and the video Keep in Time is included in the story.

The Time Variant Teaching blog makes the case for Why Direct Measurement Video are Awesome after the author attended a DMV workshop at the 2014 AAPT Summer Meeting.

Frank Noschese's Noschese 180 blog includes an image per day that can inspire physics instruction. In his post, Day 6: Direct Measurement Videos, students calculate the force that the hockey stick exerts on a hockey puck during the slapshot.
See the Hockey slap shot video.

Sibley High Teacher Captures Physics on Film Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov. 23, 2013


Presentations and Workshops

Can Direct Measurement Videos Inspire Lab-like Learning? Invited talk by Matt Vonk and Peter Bohacek, to be presented at the 2014 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Read abstract

Direct Measurement Videos with Peter Bohacek and Matt Vonk. Recorded presentation for Global Physics Department webinar series, September 2014.

Workshop: Integrating Direct Measurement Videos into Physics Instruction, by Peter Bohacek and Matt Vonk at the 2014 AAPT Summer Meeting.

Direct Measurement Videos are short videos that students can analyze using physics concepts. Students make measurements directly from the videos using grids, rulers, frame-counters and other graphic overlays. Because numerical values are not provided, direct-measurement videos give students an opportunity to engage in more open-ended approach to problem solving. In this workshop, we'll share methods for using these videos as engaging problem-solving activities in introductory mechanics instruction. We'll see how direct-measurement videos change students' approach to problem solving. We'll share some fun and challenging activities to motivate students to stretch their ability to apply physics concepts to new situations. Both the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the new AP Physics 1 and 2 curriculum expect students to engage in a range of science practices. We'll demonstrate how student can use a single video develop scientific thinking skills such as asking questions, collecting data, solving problems, and presenting results. Participants will need to bring their laptops and have QuickTime player installed.

Integrating Direct Measurement Video into Physics Teaching. Invited talk by Peter Bohacek at the Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers, July 2013


Awards

Presidential Award in Math and Science Teaching icon
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Provenance: Image from nsf.gov
Reuse: If you wish to use this item outside this site in ways that exceed fair use (see http://fairuse.stanford.edu/) you must seek permission from its creator.
The Direct Measurement Video project is honored to announce that Peter Bohacek was awarded the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. This is the highest recognition that a kindergarten through 12th grade mathematics or science teacher may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. The DMV project was an essential part of his award nomination and was featured in his award profile. Read more in this MPR News Story.

PBS Digital Innovators icon
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Provenance: Image by PBS LearningMedia and WGBH.
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Peter Bohacek was selected as one of 30 Lead PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovators for 2015. This group of tech-savvy educators from across the country was selected for their passion and commitment to innovative teaching practices that integrate digital media and technology. Peter's role in the Direct Measurement Video project was a central theme in his application. As part of his award, Peter attended the LearningMedia Digital Innovators Summit and will take part in a yearlong professional development program. These activities will further strengthen his ability to act as a digital learning ambassador with other schools and communities.

Peter Bohacek was awarded a 2014 WEM Outstanding Educator Award for Teacher Achievement. The award was granted for outstanding accomplishments and contributions to student learning via his new curriculum based on the Direct Measurement Video project. He is one of two recipients of the award, which recognizes exemplary teachers who support, inspire and assist students to attain greater learning as evidenced by student achievement. Press release