Activity Collection


Help

Show all pages

Current Search Limits

Bioregion Scale

showing only Local Community/Watershed Show all Bioregion Scale

Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

showing only Cultures & Religions Show all Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

Results 1 - 8 of 8 matches

Interviewing the Past: Developing a Sense of Place through Oral Histories
Bob Abel, Olympic College
Local changes in climate, flora, fauna, and the human population can be anecdotally explored through interviews with long time locals.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, English, Geography
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Sense of Place

Building a Public Knowledge Base: The Wikicadia Node Assignment
Todd Lundberg, Cascadia Community College
The center of this sequence of assignments is a collaborative, "New Media" writing project that involves publishing to a wiki a synthesis of knowledge about how humans inhabit places. Writers work in groups with others interested in a common sub-topic and develop information related to local places that local audiences who are invited to join the wiki may use.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sense of Place, Cultures & Religions, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint

Maps and Legends: (Re)placing Composition
Jared Leising, Cascadia Community College
Because maps tell stories, offer perspectives, and make arguments, maps also act as a metaphor for the writing assignments students are given. The writing that students do in this class creates maps to where students have been (writing stories from memory), where they currently are (writing profiles from observations of places), and where they're headed. This course approaches sustainability from the viewpoint of learning to value the places in which we live through listening to and telling stories about those places.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Cultures & Religions, Sense of Place

Interconnectedness in The Upanishads and Upon Our Sheds
James Schneider, South Puget Sound Community College
In this workshop students gain understanding of the Hindu concept of monism and how it can be related to the sustainability concept of interconnectedness to classroom community as well as the natural environment on campus.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Sacred Meals: Food, Community and Place in Indigenous Traditions
Suzanne Crawford O'Brien, Pacific Lutheran University
This assignment focuses on the importance of cultivating awareness of the interdependency of people and place. This core concept intersects with a central big idea of the course: how subsistence traditions maintain reciprocal relationships between human and ecological communities.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Cultures & Religions, Food Systems & Agriculture, Sense of Place

Native Plants, Native Peoples: Ethnobotany of the Puget Sound Bioregion
Liz Fortenbery, Tacoma Community College
Students gain a small glimpse into a native knowledge system and the relationship between people and plants, and thus begin to develop or strengthen their own relationship to native plants and the Puget Sound watershed.

Bioregion Discipline: Anthropology
Bioregion Scale: Home/Backyard, Local Community/Watershed, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions

Indigenous Food Relationships: Sociological Impacts on the Coast Salish People
Ane Berrett, Nothwest Indian College
In this unit, students will analyze the macro level of societal influences which have interrupted micro level ecological relationship between plant and man. Sociological concepts such as sub culture, dominant culture, stages of historical change (Hunter Gatherer societies to Technological societies), stratification and poverty will be addressed through the sociological perspective. Students will experience solutions of sustainability which are interdependent with local place and people. Learning activities involve using the "citizen's argument," oral presentations, portfolio creation, written reflections and experiential service learning projects.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Sociology, Biology
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Home/Backyard, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Food Systems & Agriculture, Sense of Place, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Cycles & Systems, Cultures & Religions

Recognizing the Impact of Dominant Culture Privilege
Robin Jeffers, Bellevue Community College
This sequence of five assignments, starting with the study of texts, has students taking a look at the concept of dominant culture privilege and then moving them out into their own world to analyze what they're seeing there.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Global, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Cultures & Religions, Sense of Place, Social & Environmental Justice, Ethics & Values, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Evergreen State College