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Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

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Twenty Miles from Tomorrow: Examining the Past, Present and Future of the Lower Kuskokwim River Delta
Lauren McClanahan, Western Washington University
This project involves pairing pre-service teachers with students in the rural Alaskan village of Eek in Southwestern, Alaska. By creating effective writing prompts, the pre-service teachers hope to better understand how climate change is affecting the people of this region.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Ecosystem Health, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Climate Change

Mapping Place, Writing Home: Using Interactive Compositions On and Off the Trail
Kate Reavey, Peninsula College
Students will choose a physical place to study, a site that is close enough to visit at least four times during the quarter/semester. Using writing prompts, text-based research, and close observations in the "field" (the chosen place), students will create a "mashup" of spatially referenced pop-up balloons. These will include researched and narrative prose, citations and links, and some visual images, embedded into a map via Google Earth technology. Through this unique presentation, the research and writing can encourage viewers to better understand the place they have chosen to study.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Food Systems & Agriculture, Ecosystem Health, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Sense of Place, Social & Environmental Justice, Cultures & Religions, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Maps and Legends: (Re)placing Composition
Jared Leising, Cascadia Community College
Because maps tell stories, offer perspectives, and make arguments, maps also act as a metaphor for the writing assignments students are given. The writing that students do in this class creates maps to where students have been (writing stories from memory), where they currently are (writing profiles from observations of places), and where they're headed. This course approaches sustainability from the viewpoint of learning to value the places in which we live through listening to and telling stories about those places.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Sense of Place, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice

Transportation: Waterways to Interstate Highways
Charles Luckmann, Skagit Valley College
Students practice open-ended inquiry, guided inquiry, synthesis and expository writing as they explore personal and public modes of transportation, past and present, in the Puget Sound bioregion. This activity can be adapted to any region.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Lifestyles & Consumption, Pollution & Waste, Human Impact & Footprint, Cycles & Systems, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Water & Watersheds, Cultures & Religions

Story as a Place Happening Many Times: Imaginative Writing Activity
Nancy Pagh, Western Washington University
Students are encouraged to perceive specific locations within our bioregion as having a life that includes past, present, and future. These activities present ideas for wedding the teaching of "craft" with the teaching of sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Sense of Place, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Slight of Hand: Egoism and the Tragedy of the Commons
Ty Barnes, Green River Community College
Students are introduced to a theory in the Normative Ethics of Behavior (NEB) known as Hedonic Ethical Egoism. They will learn to present and explain the "Invisible Hand Argument for Hedonic Ethical Egoism" shown to depend on the following assumption: that the community as a whole is better off if everyone acts selfishly. This assumption is false as the "Tragedy of the Commons" will show.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ethics & Values, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Meditation and Collection: "Garbage Reduction"
Gary L. Chamberlain, Seattle University
The course examines a number of unsustainable practices, the "worldview" or framework which emerged from the confluence of Christianity, the Renaissance and rise of modern science, and industrialization. We then examine new forms of Christian theological reflection leading to the construction of a framework reinforcing practices of sustainability and environmental justice.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Global, Home/Backyard
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Social & Environmental Justice

Sacred Meals: Food, Community and Place in Indigenous Traditions
Suzanne Crawford O'Brien, Pacific Lutheran University
This assignment focuses on the importance of cultivating awareness of the interdependency of people and place. This core concept intersects with a central big idea of the course: how subsistence traditions maintain reciprocal relationships between human and ecological communities.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sense of Place, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Food Systems & Agriculture

We're Screwed!
Michael C. Kalton, University of Washington
This course is designed to address the interlocked problems of unwillingness to confront the dimensions of the environmental crisis and the feelings of helplessness and despair that often accompany perceiving the gravity of the situation.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy
Bioregion Scale: Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ethics & Values, Climate Change, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Ecosystem Health

Building Sustainable Communities, But What Kind?
Hannah Love, Pacific Lutheran University
This assignment, depending on the level and depth of implementation, seeks to challenge students by asking them to look beyond "greenwashed" advertisements and buzzwords to grapple with what sustainability means, whether it can be achieved, and what kinds of questions communities must confront in a search for sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Energy, Human Health & Wellbeing, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Evergreen State College