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Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

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Results 31 - 40 of 41 matches

Our World, Our Selves
Tim Walsh, South Seattle Community College
Students will understand how ethics and psycho-emotional factors influence our relationship to and our use of the natural world. Students will read, mark, and summarize text and will use writing as a tool to explore the connections between ethics, psychology, and sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Food Systems & Agriculture, Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Cultures & Religions

Slight of Hand: Egoism and the Tragedy of the Commons
Ty Barnes, Green River Community College
Students are introduced to a theory in the Normative Ethics of Behavior (NEB) known as Hedonic Ethical Egoism. They will learn to present and explain the "Invisible Hand Argument for Hedonic Ethical Egoism" shown to depend on the following assumption: that the community as a whole is better off if everyone acts selfishly. This assumption is false as the "Tragedy of the Commons" will show.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ethics & Values, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Meditation and Collection: "Garbage Reduction"
Gary L. Chamberlain, Seattle University
The course examines a number of unsustainable practices, the "worldview" or framework which emerged from the confluence of Christianity, the Renaissance and rise of modern science, and industrialization. We then examine new forms of Christian theological reflection leading to the construction of a framework reinforcing practices of sustainability and environmental justice.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Global, Home/Backyard
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Social & Environmental Justice

Extending "The Land Ethic" and The Golden Rule to the Whole Biotic Community
Don Foran, The Evergreen State College and Centralia College
A component of an Introduction to Ethics course involving research and reporting on a specific sustainability issue. The class presentation will help the student think about extending Leopold's "Land Ethic" and "The Golden Rule" to the whole biotic community.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy, English
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Human Impact & Footprint, Ethics & Values, Social & Environmental Justice, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice

We're Screwed!
Michael C. Kalton, University of Washington
This course is designed to address the interlocked problems of unwillingness to confront the dimensions of the environmental crisis and the feelings of helplessness and despair that often accompany perceiving the gravity of the situation.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy
Bioregion Scale: Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ethics & Values, Climate Change, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Ecosystem Health

Human Rights and the Environment
Tom Kerns, North Seattle Community College
Selecting one environmental situation students will learn about some basic human rights norms and then analyze that environmental situation in terms of those human rights norms.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy, Political Science/Policy, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Civil Society & Governance, Promising Pedagogies:Case Studies, Social & Environmental Justice, Ethics & Values, Ecosystem Health

Race, Class, Gender and the Earth Crisis: Sustainability and Social Justice Meet
Dr. Cynthia Moe-Lobeda, Seattle University
Students work collaboratively to construct knowledge about the intersection of social justice and ecological integrity. Students will chose a consumer product that has adverse ecological and social justice impacts and develop a set of proposals for action that would challenge, dismantle or diminish those adverse consequences.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Social & Environmental Justice, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Promising Pedagogies:Learning Communities

Community Questions, Global Answers, and the Ethics of Environmental Responsibility
Amos Nascimento, University of Washington Tacoma
This submission is both a course and an activity using the bioregion as a resource for environmental ethics. The first part of the course is devoted to questions (fact gathering) related to the bioregion. The second part is reflecting and focused on global answers.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy, Religious Studies, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Ethics & Values, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Civil Society & Governance, Sense of Place

Detox Me: How To Reduce Your Exposure To Toxins Found In Everyday Products
Surya Tewari, Bellevue Community College
I use the topic when I am discussing cancer in either nutrition or biology class. Talking about genetic and environmental factors that can increase the incidence of cancer, and the homework, helps students understand how adjusting their environment can help reduce their risk for developing cancer.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: National/Continental, Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Human Health & Wellbeing, Civil Society & Governance, Social & Environmental Justice, Food Systems & Agriculture

Chemistry Laboratory Waste Evaluation
Tracy D. Harvey, University of Washington
From the scientific viewpoint, this evaluation will help the students see a process instead of just a data collection event, and they will get to practice estimating amounts. They will also need to determine the products of any reactions performed during the experiment. From the standpoint of sustainability, this evaluation is intended to help the student recognize the environmental "cost" of an experiment-in consumables used and in waste products generated.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Human Health & Wellbeing, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Evergreen State College