Activity Collection


Help

Show all pages

Current Search Limits

Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

showing only Social & Environmental Justice Show all Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

Results 21 - 30 of 41 matches

Using Reflection Activities in the Field to Deepen Student Learning
Holly Hughes, Edmonds Community College
This activity offers one of the reflection activities we developed in our learning community "Exploring Natural History in Word and Field." In this class, the students learn about natural history by reading natural history essays and participating in field trips. In this activity, we use reflection before and during a field trip to an Old Growth Forest to help our students clarify their own stance for a Position Paper on whether and under what conditions logging should be allowed in Old Growth Forests.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, History, Sociology
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Human Impact & Footprint, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sense of Place, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice

Seeing Sustainability
Kate Davies, Center for Creative Change, Antioch University Seattle
This assignment requires students to reflective observations of a particular place and to identify signs of sustainability and unsustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Design & Planning, Human Health & Wellbeing, Human Impact & Footprint, Ecosystem Health, Lifestyles & Consumption, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Social & Environmental Justice, Sense of Place

Environmental Justice in Tacoma: A Non-Majors Qualitative Assessment of Pollution and Public Policy in the Local Community
Jim Gawel, University of Washington- Tacoma
This activity is designed to get non-environmental majors to qualitatively examine their own community for evidence of environmental injustice. Using a mix of evidence from online sources (U.S. Census, EnviroMapper, Toxic Release Inventory, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, etc.) and field observations, student groups describe the population and pollution sources found within an assigned elementary school district in Tacoma.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Pollution & Waste

Tracking the Carbon Footprint in Drug Design-- Medical, Environmental, Social Implications
James Y. Chen, Sound Community College
In this activity, students conduct a lab exercise over three lab sessions by taking a small sample of a pharmaceutical compound, slightly modifying its chemical structure, purifying the modified product sample and analyzing it for yield, purity and identity.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Health & Wellbeing, Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste

The Sustainability Triangle: How Do We Apply Science to Decision Making?
Brian Naasz, Pacific Lutheran University
This writing assignment uses the "Sustainable Development Triangle" as a framework to critically evaluate an environmental issue of the student's choice. This learning activity provides an opportunity for an introductory chemistry student to use the sustainability's "Triple Bottom Line" as a tool to use material learned in the classroom to look at how environmental science helps inform economic and social/cultural factors in the development of sustainable solutions to our environmental challenges.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Impact & Footprint, Food Systems & Agriculture, Ecosystem Health, Climate Change, Natural Resources, Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Writing and Walking, Pilgrimage and Process: Working with the Essays of Linda Hogan & Henry David Thoreau
Rebecca Chamberlain, The Evergreen State College
By comparing and contrasting the essays of Hogan and Thoreau, students begin to develop a more complex understanding of their own identity and sense of place; the historical and cultural context around issues of sustainability and environmental ethics.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sense of Place, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Ethics & Values

The Sustainability of Place: Making Scholarship Public
Jill Gatlin, University of Washington
Students are assigned to observe and research a local place of their choosing and to develop a unique analytical argument about the social and/or ecological sustainability of this space. The final project is a pamphlet directed to a public audience accompanied by a proposal for its production and distribution.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Toxic Hygiene: How Safe Is Your Bathroom?
Danielle Gray, Whatcom Community College
Students learn about potential safety and health concerns of personal hygiene products. Students examine labels and advertisements of these projects and then engage in rhetorical and cultural analysis of these advertisements.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Home/Backyard
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice, Cultures & Religions, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Health & Wellbeing, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice

Recognizing the Impact of Dominant Culture Privilege
Robin Jeffers, Bellevue Community College
This sequence of five assignments, starting with the study of texts, has students taking a look at the concept of dominant culture privilege and then moving them out into their own world to analyze what they're seeing there.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Global, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ethics & Values, Cultures & Religions, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sense of Place, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice

Investigating Local Food: Meet Your Washington Farmers
June Johnson Bube, Seattle University
This assignment sequence seeks to stimulate students' thinking and writing about food production in the western Washington bioregion through a series of activities combining readings, class discussion, fieldwork, and writing assignments. Collaborative work in and outside of class culminates in students' interviewing local farmers and vendors at farmers markets and writing a surprising informative essay.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Health & Wellbeing, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Food Systems & Agriculture, Social & Environmental Justice, Ecosystem Health, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Evergreen State College