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Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

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Delocalized Diets: Globalization, Food, and Culture
Mary L. Russell, Pierce College
This assignment addresses cultural sustainability by asking students to go beyond distinguishing between five subsistence strategies to examining the impact of globalization on diet and culture.

Bioregion Discipline: Anthropology, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: National/Continental, Local Community/Watershed, Regional, Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Heath & Wellbeing, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Food Systems & Agriculture

Renewable - But Is It Sustainable?
Carol Burton, Bellevue Community College
Production of biofuels as an alternative energy source is not as simple as the media portray. This exercise enables students to practice critical thinking skills in evaluating the "value" of biofuels - a somewhat ambiguous concept.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Biology
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Energy, Social & Environmental Justice

Skeleton Keys: Bonified Biology
J. Brian Hauge, Peninsula College
This series of exercises focuses on: the importance of observation in science; the proper use of scientific terminology and writing; the interrelationships between anatomy and position in a food web or energy pyramid; the biology of exotic species; toxins in the environment; animal use; and, the evolutionary significance of each of these topics.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Social & Environmental Justice, Food Systems & Agriculture

What is Local?
William R. Teska, Pacific Lutheran University
Through a hands-on examination of a nature preserve/park in a nearby urban setting and with classroom discussions and activities, students become aware that individuals are affected differently by the preservation of nature or by development of natural resources.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Sense of Place, Natural Resources, Human Heath & Wellbeing

Exploring The Impact of Increased Acid Levels in Ocean Waters on Coral
Dharshi Bopegedera, The Evergreen State College
The goal of this laboratory is to help students understand that burning fossil fuels, which results in an increase in the acidity of ocean waters, has a detrimental impact on marine life (specifically coral but also other organisms that have calcium carbonate based shells).

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Water & Watersheds, Social & Environmental Justice, Climate Change

Tracking the Carbon Footprint in Drug Design-- Medical, Environmental, Social Implications
James Y. Chen, Sound Community College
In this activity, students conduct a lab exercise over three lab sessions by taking a small sample of a pharmaceutical compound, slightly modifying its chemical structure, purifying the modified product sample and analyzing it for yield, purity and identity.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Human Heath & Wellbeing, Pollution & Waste

Alternative Deicers: An Application of Freezing Point Depression
Jennie Mayer and Daniel Mitchell, Bellevue Community College
Road deicers raise several environmental and cost concerns. In this activity students consider alternatives while investigating colligative properties.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice

The Sustainability Triangle: How Do We Apply Science to Decision Making?
Brian Naasz, Pacific Lutheran University
This writing assignment uses the "Sustainable Development Triangle" as a framework to critically evaluate an environmental issue of the student's choice. This learning activity provides an opportunity for an introductory chemistry student to use the sustainability's "Triple Bottom Line" as a tool to use material learned in the classroom to look at how environmental science helps inform economic and social/cultural factors in the development of sustainable solutions to our environmental challenges.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Food Systems & Agriculture, Pollution & Waste, Natural Resources, Human Impact & Footprint, Ecosystem Health, Climate Change, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice

Writing and Walking, Pilgrimage and Process: Working with the Essays of Linda Hogan & Henry David Thoreau
Rebecca Chamberlain, The Evergreen State College
By comparing and contrasting the essays of Hogan and Thoreau, students begin to develop a more complex understanding of their own identity and sense of place; the historical and cultural context around issues of sustainability and environmental ethics.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Sense of Place, Social & Environmental Justice, Ethics & Values

Critical Thinking on Sustainable Food Production and Consumer Habits
Michael Faucette, Seattle Central Community College
Students are assigned to research, write, take a position and present it on the complex issue of sustainable food production and consumer habits.

Bioregion Discipline: English, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional, National/Continental, Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Lifestyles & Consumption, Social & Environmental Justice, Food Systems & Agriculture

Evergreen State College